The journal of a tour to the Hebrides, with Samuel Johnson

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Seite 414 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses, whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me and...
Seite 7 - ... the order of society, and from a veneration for the Great Source of all order ; correct, nay stern in his taste ; hard to please, and easily offended, impetuous and irritable in his temper, but of a most humane and benevolent heart...
Seite 238 - Our ancestors having most indisputably a competent jurisdiction to decide this great and important question, and having, in fact, decided it, it is now become our duty, at this distance of...
Seite 18 - There must always be some advantage, on one side or other; and it is better that advantage should be had by talents, than by chance. If lawyers were to undertake no causes till they were sure they were just, a man might be precluded altogether from a trial of his claim, though, were it judicially examined, it might be found a very just claim.
Seite 8 - He was prone to superstition, but not to credulity. Though his imagination might incline him to a belief of the marvellous and the mysterious, his vigorous reason examined the evidence with jealousy.
Seite 156 - Before me, and on either side, were high hills, which by hindering the eye from ranging, forced the mind to find entertainment for itself. Whether I spent the hour well I know not ; for here I first conceived the thought of this narration.
Seite 211 - Tartan waistcoat with gold buttons and gold button-holes, a bluish philibeg, and Tartan hose. He had jet black hair tied behind, and was a large stately man, with a steady sensible countenance.
Seite 7 - In him were united a most logical head with a most fertile imagination, which gave him an extraordinary advantage in arguing: for he could reason close or wide, as he saw best for the moment. Exulting in his intellectual...
Seite 271 - There is no tracing the connection of ancient nations, but by language ; and therefore I am always sorry when any language is lost, because languages are the pedigree of nations.
Seite 103 - Johnson, upon all occasions, expressed his approbation of enforcing instruction by means of the rod. "I would rather [said he] have the rod to be the general terror to all, to make them learn, than tell a child, if you do thus, or thus, you will be -more esteemed than your brothers or sisters. The rod produces an effect which terminates in itself. A child is afraid of being whipped, and gets his task, and there's an end on't; whereas, by exciting emulation and comparisons of superiority, you lay...

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