The Impact of Discovering Life Beyond Earth

Cover
Steven J. Dick
Cambridge University Press, 26.10.2015 - 366 Seiten
The search for life in the Universe, once the domain of science fiction, is now a robust research program with a well-defined roadmap, from studying the extremes of life on Earth to exploring the possible niches for life in the Solar System and discovering thousands of planets far beyond it. In addition to constituting a major scientific endeavor, astrobiology is one of the most popular topics in astronomy, and is of growing interest to a broad community of thinkers from across the academic spectrum. In this volume, distinguished philosophers, theologians, anthropologists, historians and scientists discuss the big questions about how the discovery of extraterrestrial life, whether intelligent or microbial, would impact society. Their remarkable and often surprising findings challenge our foundational concepts of what the discovery of alien life may hold for humankind. Written in easily accessible language, this thought-provoking collection engages a wide audience of readers from all backgrounds.
 

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Inhalt

Motivations and approaches
7
The philosophy of astrobiology
23
History discovery analogy
38
A multidimensional impact model for
55
Transcending anthropocentrism
77
lori marino
95
assessing universality from
113
Equating culture civilization and moral
127
The moral subject of astrobiology
207
robin w lovin
222
Would you baptize an extraterrestrial?
233
how should society prepare
245
Preparing for the discovery of extraterrestrial
263
SETI in nonWestern perspective
299
The allure of alien life
308
Internalizing null extraterrestrial signals
324

Communicating with the other
143
Philosophical theological and moral impact
155
Klaatu Barada Nikto or do they really
175
Alien minds
189
Contributor biographies
338
Index
349
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Über den Autor (2015)

Steven J. Dick held the 2014 Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology at the John W. Kluge Center of the Library of Congress. In 2013 he testified before Congress on the subject of astrobiology. He served as the Charles A. Lindbergh Chair in Aerospace History at the National Air and Space Museum (2011-2012), and as the NASA Chief Historian and Director of the NASA History Office (2003-2009). He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the NASA Exceptional Service Medal and the Navy Meritorious Civilian Service Medal, and is author or editor of twenty books, including The Biological Universe (1996). He was awarded the 2006 LeRoy E. Doggett Prize for Historical Astronomy of the American Astronomical Society. In 2009, the International Astronomical Union designated minor planet 6544 stevendick in his honor.

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