A Journey to Iceland and Travels in Sweden and Norway

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G. P. Putnam, 1852 - 273 Seiten
 

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Seite 138 - I sat either beneath my tent, or in front of it, listening with stretched attention for the signs I had been told to expect. Towards midnight — the hour for spirits — I heard a few dull sounds, like those of a distant cannon, and rushing from the tent, I waited for the subterranean rumblings and the trembling and splitting of the earth, which, according to the books I had read, were the forerunners of an eruption. I could hardly defend myself from a paroxysm of fear ; it is no slight thing to...
Seite 214 - A few of the burghers' wives had little caps like those worn in Suabia, with a small, black, embroidered veil thrown over them, which did not conceal their faces, however. I noticed here, what had already struck me in Copenhagen, a number of boys among the drummers and musicians, who could not have been more than ten or twelve years old. The king remained two days at Gottenburg, and during that time all the windows were illuminated, and festooned with fresh flowers every evening. A few transparencies...
Seite 141 - I looked round at the tent— how small, how diminutive it seemed compared to those pillars of water! and yet it was nearly twenty feet high. It was lying rather lower, it is true, than the basin of the Geiser ; but tent might have been piled on tent, — yes, by my reckoning, which may not have been perfectly accurate, however, — five or six, one above the other, would not have reached the elevation of these jets, the largest of which I think I can affirm, without any exaggeration, to have risen...
Seite 142 - When this wonderful scene was ended, the peasant went with me to examine the basin and caldron; we could approach very near them without the least danger, but there was nothing further to be seen. The waters had entirely disappeared from the basin, into which we entered, and walked close up to the caldron, where they had also sunk to the depth of seven or eight feet, though they were still boiling and bubbling with great violence. I broke off a few pieces of crust from the interior of the basin and...
Seite 141 - ... spot, and as the waters boiled over as usual, and the noise died away, I thought I was doomed to disappointment again ; but the last tones were just expiring when the explosion suddenly took place. I have really no words to do justice to this magnificent spectacle, which once to behold in a lifetime is enough. It infinitely surpassed all my expectations. The waters were spouted with great power and volume ; column rising above column, as if each were bent on outstripping the others.
Seite 141 - I had recovered in some degree from my first astonishment, I looked round at the tent — how small, how diminutive it seemed, compared to those pillars of water '. And yet it was nearly twenty feet high ; it was lying rather lower, it is true, than the basin of the Geiser ; but tent might have been piled on tent, — yes, by...
Seite 59 - Icelandic. They are small and low. built of lava blocks, filled in with earth, the whole sodded over with grass, and they might easily be mistaken for natural elevations in the ground, if the wooden chimneys, the low doors, and almost imperceptible windows, did not betray that they were tenanted by human beings. A dark and narrow passage, not more than four feet high, leads on one hand to the dwelling-room, and on the other to the storeroom, where the provisions are kept, which is also used in winter...
Seite 60 - ... as well as the beds. Poles are fastened in the walls, to which clothes, shoes and stockings, and other things of that kind are suspended; and a little shelf, with a few books on it, is generally found in each hut. No stoves are needed in these crowded rooms, which are sufficiently heated by the warmth of their numerous inmates. ' There are also poles in the fireplaces to hang up the wet clothing and dry the fish. The smoke often spreads itself over the room, and finds its way very slowly out...
Seite 175 - From sixteen to twenty-four cents. — 3V. this habit seems to have as great a charm for them as smoking has with us. They also chew incessantly. Their manner of taking snuff is so peculiar that I must be forgiven for describing it. Most of the peasants, and even many of the priests, have no boxes, but they make use instead of a piece of bone, turned in the shape of a little powder-horn ; and when they wish to indulge themselves in a pinch, they throw back their heads, and...
Seite 157 - ... blue of the heavens reappeared, and the sun once more rejoiced us with his presence. I remained on the top of the mountain till the clouds had opened in the distance, and afforded a welcome and extensive view, which I fear my pen is much too feeble to describe. I despair of conveying to my reader a distinct idea of the immense waste which lay displayed before me, with its accumulated masses of lava and its peculiar appearance of lifeless desolation. I seemed to stand in the midst of an exhausted...

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