The life of Samuel Johnson ... including A journal of a tour to the Hebrides. With additions and notes, by J.W. Croker, Band 2

Cover
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 142 - If I had not done among them the works which none other man did, they had not had sin: but now have they both seen and hated both me and my Father.
Seite 273 - He the best player!" cries Partridge, with a contemptuous sneer, "why, I could act as well as he myself. I am sure, if I had seen a ghost, I should have looked in the very same manner, and done just as he did.
Seite 284 - The teeming mother anxious for her race, Begs for each birth the fortune of a face: Yet Vane could tell what ills from beauty spring; And Sedley curs'd the form that pleas'da king.
Seite 185 - I collated such copies as I could procure, and wished for more, but have not found the collectors of these rarities very communicative.
Seite 255 - He was steady and inflexible in maintaining the obligations of religion and morality, both from a regard for the order of society, and from a veneration for the Great Source of all order ; correct, nay, stern in his taste ; hard to please, and easily offended ; impetuous and irritable in his temper, but of a most humane and benevolent heart...
Seite 225 - Goldsmith's abridgment is better than that of Lucius Florus or Eutropius; and I will venture to say that if you compare him with Vertot, in the same places of the Roman History, you will find that he excels Vertot. Sir, he has the art of compiling, and of saying every thing he has to say in a pleasing manner. He is now writing a Natural History, and will make it as entertaining as a Persian Tale.
Seite 28 - To omit for a year, or for a day, the most efficacious method of advancing Christianity, in compliance with any purposes that terminate on this side of the grave, is a crime of which I know not that the world has yet had an example, except in the practice of the planters of America, a race of mortals whom, I suppose, no other man wishes to resemble.
Seite 177 - Road, and had carried down his books in two returned postchaises. He said he believed the farmer's family thought him an odd character, similar to that in which the Spectator appeared to his landlady and her children : he was the gentleman. Mr. Mickle, the translator of « The Lusiad,' and I went to visit him at this place a few days afterwards. He was not at home; but, having a curiosity to see his apartment, we went in, and found curious scraps of descriptions of animals scrawled upon the wall...
Seite 224 - Whether indeed we take him as a poet, — as a comic writer, — or as an historian, he stands in the first class." Boswell. " An historian ! my dear Sir, you surely will not rank his compilation of the Roman History, with the works of other historians of this age.
Seite 107 - Why, Sir, it is a very harmless doctrine. They are of opinion that the generality of mankind are neither so obstinately wicked as to deserve everlasting punishment, nor so good as to merit being admitted into the society of blessed spirits ; and therefore that GOD is graciously pleased to allow of a middle state, where they may be purified by certain degrees of suffering. You sec, Sir, there is nothing unreasonable in this.

Bibliografische Informationen