How to Read the Constitution: Originalism, Constitutional Interpretation, and Judicial Power

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Rowman & Littlefield, 1996 - 226 Seiten
Prominent constitutional scholar Christopher Wolfe challenges popular opinions by presenting an insightful and well-supported defense of originalist interpretations of the Constitution. He describes the traditional approach to constitutional interpretation and judicial review and then focuses his analysis on the due process clause, which has become the source of most modern constitutional law. Wolfe challenges the most influential defenders of judicial activism, including Laurence Tribe, Michael Dorf, Harry Wellington, and Mark Tushnet, and he persuasively explains the dire political consequences of taking the Constitution out of constitutional law.
 

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Inhalt

How to Read and Interpret the Constitution
3
The Original Meaning of the Due Process Clause
27
Between Scylla and Charybdis Powell and Berger on the Framers and Original Intention
43
How the Constitution Was Taken Out of Constitutional Law
85
The ResultOriented Adjudicators Guide to Constitutional Law I Laurence Tribe and Michael Dorf
107
The ResultOriented Adjudicators Guide to Constitutional Law II Harry Wellington
125
Grand Theories and Ambiguous Republican Critique Mark Tushnet on Contemporary Constitutional Law
149
Constitutional Interpretation and Precedent
175
Notes
193
Index
215
About the Author
221
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (1996)

Christopher Wolfe is professor of political science at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

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