Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

SPECIMENS

OF THE

EARLY NATIVE POETRY

OF

IRELAND,

IN

ENGLISH METRICAL TRANSLATIONS,

BY

MISS BROOKE, DR. DRUMMOND, SAMUEL FERGUSON, J. C. MANGAN,
T. FURLONG, H. GRATTAN CURRAN, EDW. WALSH,

J. D'ALTON, AND JOHN ANSTER, ETC.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

JAMES MCGLASHAN, 21, D'OLIER-STREET.

W. S. ORR AND CO., LONDON.

[blocks in formation]

“When a people are pre-exalted in their own feelings, and ennobled in their own estimation by the consciousness that they have been illustrious in ages that are gone by-that their recollections have come down to them from a remote and heroic ancestry--in a word, that they have A NATIONAL POETRY of their own; we are willing to acknowledge that their pride is reasonable, and they are ennobled in our eyes by the same circumstance which gave them elevation in their own."-SCHLEGEL ; Lects. on Lit.

Dublin : Printed by EDWARD BULL, 6, Bachelor's Walk.

ADVERTISEMENT.

The object of the present volume is, to bring together, in a small compass, some of the choicest gems of native poetry, scattered over the pages of periodicals, and of heavy quartos and expensive collections—unaccompanied by the originals, which, however valuable in themselves, would possess no interest to the mere English reader. It seems a prominent characteristic of the present day, both in these islands and on the continent, that the popular taste is recurring to the productions of early times, and reviving the spirit of primitive literary ages. Of this, the institution of national Archæological Societies, both in England and Ireland, would of itself afford sufficient evidence. Nor is the increased attention which begins to be paid to the history and literature of Ireland, less obvious; and the idea occurred, that somewhat towards promoting both of these objects might be effected, by placing before the public, in a more accessible and popular form than they have hitherto appeared, a small collection

of such fragments of Irish poetry as possessed historical interest, and which, with a running commentary might serve to illustrate the ages to which they respectively belong. It is but just to state that the only poetical versions original to this volume are those by Mr. Mangan.

By the patriotic and highly-gifted Miss Brooke, the claims of the native poetry of Ireland have been thus eloquently stated, in a note to one of her admirable translations :—“As productions abounding with numberless beauties they plead for preservation, and recommend themselves to taste; and as they certainly relate to an age of much antiquity, and reflect much light on manners, customs, and events, that, in consequence of modern pyrrhonism, have been doubted ever to have existed, they surely have a high and serious claim to attention, and call equally upon the poet, the historian, and the public-spirited, to preserve these relics of ancient genius amongst us! But Irishmen-or all, at least, who would be thought to pride themselves in the name, or to reflect back any portion of the honour they derive from it—they are particularly called upon, in favour of their country, to rescue these little sparks from the ashes of her former glory."

BELFAST, July, 1846.

« ZurückWeiter »