Abbildungen der Seite
PDF

XL

Yet Speteh ev^a there, submissively withdraws

{Cause;

. From Rights of &ubj<£tsy and the Toar Mans

[Laws.

Thenpompous Silence reigns, and stills thenoifie

XII.

Past Services of Friends, good Deeds of Foes,
What FavMtes gain, and what th'Exchequer

[owes,

Fly the forgetful World, and in thy Arms repofe.

XIII.

• The Country Wit, ReKgion of the Town,

The Courtier's Learning, Policy oW Gown, Arebestbythee express'd, and shine in thee alone.

XIV.

The Parson's Cant, the Lawyers Sophists y* Lord's Quibble, Critick's. Jest:; all end in thee, All rest in Peace at last, and fleep eternally.

... .m TO T o T*H E

Author of a Poem,

IN TITLED, '7

& u c c E s s i a

... . , . • ,' ,» 1..,

BEgone ye Cvitieks, and restrain your Spice,
Codrvs writes cm, and wild for erer" wii*e';
The heaviest Muse the swiftest Course bat gone,
As Cfodks xm sefteft wfcen most Lead i9 on,:
What tho' n& Bees afouwd yew Cradle flow,
Nor on yotit hipi &Mfr&Mt golden* Dew?
Yet have we oft discover'd in their stead,
A Swarm of DroneSythat bina^about your Head.
When you, like Orffieasyftdke the warblingLyre,
Attentive Blocks stand round you, and admire.

L x Wit, Wit, past thro' thee, no longer is the fame,

As Meat digested takes a diff'rent Name;
But Sense must sure thy safest Plunder be,
Since no Reprisals can be made on thee.
Thus thou may'st Rife, and in thy daring Flight
(Tho' ne'er so weighty) reach a wondrous height;
So, forc'd-from Engines, Lead it self can fly,
And pondrous Slugs move nimbly thro' the Sky.
Sure Bavins copy'd Mœvius to the full,
And Charilus taught Codrus to be dull;
Therefore, dear Friend, at my Advice give o'er
This needless Labour, and contend no more,
To prove a dull Succession to be true,
Since 'tis enough We find it so in You.

[graphic]

'A

POE M

To the Memory of

Mr. JOHN PHILIPS. To a F R 1 E N p.

By Mr. EeDMVNeD SMITH.

SIR, V —

SINCE our Isis silently deplores
J J r [Shores;

The Bard who spread her Fame to distant

Since nobler Pens their mournful Lays suspend;.

My honest Zeal, if not my Verse, commend,

Forgive the Poet, and approve the Friend.

h 3 Your

Your Care had long his fleeting Life restrain'd, One Table fed you, and one Bed contain'd; For his dear Sake long restless Nights you bore,^ While rat'ling Coughs his heaving Vessels tore,> Much was his Pain, but your Affliction more. ^ Oh! had no Summons from the noisy Gown Call'd thee, unwilling, to the nauseous Town, Thy Love had o'er the dull Disease prevail'd, Thy Mirth had cur'd where baffled Physick faiPd; But since the Will of Heav'n his Fate decreed, To thy kind Care my worthless Lines succeed; Fruitless our Hopes, tho' pious our Essays, | Yours to preserve a Friend, and mine to praise.

♦Oh! might I paint him in MUtonian. Verfee WithiStrains like those he sung on Gtijier\Herse; But with the meaner Tribe I'm forc'd to chime, And wanting Strenth to rife, descend to Rhyme.

« ZurückWeiter »