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OR.

UNFETTERED THINKER AND PLAIN SPEAKER FOR

TRUTH, FREEDOM, AND PROGRESS.

1850.

" And though all the winds of doctrine were let loose to play upon the earth,
so Truth be in the field, we do injuriously to misdoubt her strength. Let her and
Falsehood grapple! Whoever knew Truth put to the worse, in a free and open

encounter ?”—MILTON'S AREOPAGITICA.

LONDON:
PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY
JAMES WATSON, 3, QUEEN'S HEAD PASSAGE

PATERNOSTER ROW.

Ito

awcom
2- 20.76
12772

CON TE-N TS.

Original Poetry.

GERALD MASSEY.

W. MOY THOMAS. T'Twas Christmas Eve'-24. A Call to the Sonnet to Spenser-120. Song from Burger People-56. The Three Voices—72. The Cry -168. Lucifer: a fragment—469. of the Unemployed—104. The Kingliest Crown

THOMAS COOPER. -120. A Lay of Love--136. This World is Truth is growing'- 40. The Time shall full of Beauty - 216. •No jewelled Beauty is come'-40. Spring—280. my Love'-248. • Press on, press on!'-264. • There's no dearth of Kindness' - 296. The

F. TURNBULL.

Sonnet to Spenser-7. Famine-smitten--344. Sweet Smile on the

A Winter Dream

(Hereward)—184. cheek of thy Home-358. Song of the Red Republican— 376. A Night Musing—892.

FRANK GRANT.

Hints---89. A Night Thought-136.
J. A. LANGFORD.

GEO. HOOPER (EUGENE). • Oh, give us Rest!'- 88. The Wish re

The Hopes of '48—24. To little Lelia E.-56. paired — 137. • Oh, never doubt of Man !'152. "Sonnet to Kossuth-198. Sonnet to

WM. WHITMORE. Mazzini--198. Helen--232. The Poet's Heri- |

To Mazzini and Kossuth---56. Shakspere's tage--264. Stanzas for the Times—296. The

Birth-d n the Future-328. Tale of Love-312, Ode of Horace translated

S, M, KYDD.
-408. An Autumn Reverie-424. Sonnet to Boat Song—25.
Shelley—328. Human Nature-469.

EDWARD SMITH.
WM. JONES.

The Red Indian-57.
The Peasant's Epitaph—41. February-88.

WM. WYLIE.
Sonnet–168. The March Wind-200. The
Lowlands sweet — 246. The Hawthorn Bush

A Moorland Carol—104. in bloom-360.

ALEXANDER BELL.
J. W. KING.

The Mountain Glen-440,
Martial Glory-248. Lookup, ye toiling mil-

THOS. BELL. licns'-345. A Summer invitation-424. Song

Blue Bell and Primrose- 120. -468.

S. WILKS.
H, R. NICHOLLS.

The True Sabbath-408.
Thoughts-326. The Worker's Vision-422

EDRIC.
Country Musings—456.

To Kenilworth Castle-312.
JOHN ACKROYD.

номо. Sonnet to Spring-280. Sonnet on Beauty A Lay of Free Thought-344. –296. To Poverty—312.

A POWER-LOOM WEAVER.
GEO. TWEDDELL.

Toil, Brothers, toil !—152.
The Primrose—232. Sonnet, written in York

SHELDON CHADWICK. Castle-263. Rienzi-264.

Eternal Beauty–456.

Original Prose.

THOMAS COOPER. LETTERS :-To the Young Men of the Work- / 4. The Miracles (Second Discourse)—185, 201, ing Classes—1, 81, 129, 209. To the Lord Harry' 219, 237, 253, 269, 284. of Exeter-5, 66, 177. To Lord Nugent-17. 5. The Transfiguration of Jesus-300, 316, 333. To Lord Dudley Stuart--33. To Earl Talbot-65. 6, The Passion, Crucifixion, &c.—345, 363, 381.

CRITICAL EXEGESIS OF GOSPEL HISTORY :- 7. The Resurrection and Ascension-397, 413, 1. The Birth and Childhood of Jesus—8, 25, 41. 425, 441, 457, 476. 2. The Baptism and Temptation of Jesus-57, ORATIONS:- The Life and Genius of Sir Isaac 37. 89.

Newton-271, 233, 249. The Age of Chivalry 3. The Miracles (First Discourse).-105, 121, 1—265, 281. Moral and Political Lessons of 137, 153, 169.

Gulliver's Travels'297, 313, 329.

THOMAS COOPER (CONTINUED).

SAMUEL M. KYDD. The "Times' putting on its Spectacles-18. Letter on Mental Culture-3. Pen and Ink Probable Whig Tactics for 1850—49. Resolu- Sketches of Life-67, 99. The Ten Hours' Act tion of Whiggery to take its ease-97. Good -178. State of the Nation-419. Louis NapoNews: The Organisation of Labour commenced leon-449. Mercantile Philosophy-466. in London--98. Education and Sabbath Obser

THOMAS SHORTER. yance-145. 'Doing Nothing the Season for Mis - The People's Duty regarding National Educhief-161. What the Poor think in France- cation--194. The Crisis at hand, in France243. Arguments and Purposes of the Sunday 322. Reflections on the 79th Birth-day of Robert Sabbatarians-257. Of what Use is St. Paul's Owen-370. Power of the Working Classes, and Cathedral ?_275. The only Help for Working their Duty in reference to Association-418. Men-305. The Type of the Principle of • Order-321. The Working Man's Question-417.

RICHARD OTLEY. Testimony to the Value of Mesmerism–60. Phi

:: Reminiscences of Ebenezer Elliott--339, 354, losophy of Mesmerism-225. A Reminiscence,

* The Demon of Despotism-356, 377, 393, 409. of Wordsworth-291, 324. Notes which they

The Philosopy of Death-427. who run may Read-117, 133, 196, 307. Notes

GEORGE HOOPER. of Travel and Talk-387, 438, 454, 467. Fare- ! France; The Chaos of Order'-50. The well Words-471. Matters which are note. Duty of the Hour-353. worthy at the Present Time-472.

JOHN YEATS.
FRANK GRANT.

Thoughts Suggested by the Birth of a Child - A Political Lesson from the Vasty Deep-83. 361. What can we Do?-403. A Country Walk An Argument for Universal Suffrage-115. Unity –444. of Sentiment in Authors—132. The Church

| GEo. TWEDDELL. really in danger -- 193. The Church and her Marriage Sketches—84. Grievances-213. Friends of Order' in France:

GERALD MASSEY, Who are They ?—241. The ‘Quarterly,' M. Gui

Signs of Progress-113.
zot, and Democracy-244. The Educationists and
the Religionists --- 289.

ALEXANDER BELL.
Episcopal hostility to
Secular Education-337. The Lords, and their

Labour and Capital: Association-273.
New House-369, The Value of Leisure-372.

LEGO. Lamartine on Socialism-385. A Word about Principle and Expediency-148. Sunday Observance-401. The Golden Prize-

C. F. NICHOLLS. 406. What's the Use of a House of Lords ?--433. Thoughts on Progress—435.

Correspondence. From Walter Cooper-21. Samuel M. Kydd , T.T. Campbell--101. W. Peplow-149. E. Med-22. Thomas Shorter-36, 69. John Vickers ley-163. T. E, B.-181. J. H. Nodall—230. -35. Friend of the People - 37. C.F. Nicholls Times'--230. Alpha Beta-292. D. C. (on the -52. James Benny_52. An Operative-58. word Proletarian ) --294. Omicron--310. One of E. Wilson–53. W. Middleton-53. W. Whit- the People in the Potteries-342. E.J.Turnermore--53. James M‘Donald-69. J.Black-69. 374. J.Clark-374. J. Holmes-451. Dr. Smiles

' _470.

Reviews. Lælius: Mons. Guizot; or Democracy, Oli- | Mazzini's Letter on French Intervention at garchy, and Monarchy'-45. Langford, Harris, Rome'--140. Uxbridge Spirit of Freedom'and Latham: Thoughts from the Inner Circle' | 140. Lott's • One Hundred Sonnets'- 140, -63.' Jones's “Spirit; or a Dream in the Wood - Parker's “Discourse of Matters pertaining to lands–63. Lamartine’s ‘French Revolution of Religion'--171, 188, 206. King's Lays of a 1848'-76. Leicester Working Men's Essays on Struggling Heart’-205. Lees' Poems'-237. Labour, &c-91. Emery's Essays on Education Spencer Hall's Life and Death in Ireland' and the Causes of Crime-108. Staffordshire --303, 287. Adam's Peace Lyrics'—319. Potteries' • Working Man's Journal'-109. Lei. Cheltenham Artizan's Social Reform'—436. cester, Nottingham, and Leeds Periodicals--126. Macansh’s ‘Social Curse; or Intemperance' Martineau's Eastern Life'--109, 126, 142, 158. -437.

Thinkings.

Isaac Barrow-23. W. Savage Landor-39.-215. Dr. Parr-247. John Locke-231, 279, Dr. Johnson–55. Lawrence Sterne-71. James D. Hume-295. Paley-311, Lord Bacon-327. Burgh-87. Thomas Carlyle-103, 119. Ralph Thos, Paine-343. Edm. Burke-359. Jeremy W. Emerson-135, 151. Owen Felltham-167. Bentham-375. Milton-391. Zimmerman Wm. Godwin-183. Ben Jonson-199, Shelley | 423. Thos, Cogan-439. Joseph Addison-455.

OR, UNFETTERED THINKER AND PLAIN SPEAKER FOR

TRUTH, FREEDOM, AND PROGRESS. .

And though all the winds of doctrine were let loose to play upon the earth, so Truth be in the field, we do injuriously to misdoubt her strength. Let her and Falsehood grapple! Who ever knew Truth put to the worse, in a free and open encounter?"-Milton's Areopagitica.

No. 1.-Vol. I.]

FOR THE WEEK ENDING SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 1850.

[Price One Penny.

TO THE YOUNG MEN OF THE WORKING CLASSES.

LETTER I. NEW SERIES.
“ They say your purpose might be gained at once-
By some rare method, could you find it out;
But, men, in their impatience, often scorn
The surer path, and essay many roads-
Only to be chagrined : then turn to take
The way which first did promise them success;

And sorrow o'er their time and labour lost.:- Old Play. MEN OF THE FUTURE, If any new proof had been wanting, in addition to the many recorded by history, that the freedom which the intellectual Few can win, the unintellectual Many may easily lose,—this proof has been given us in the events of the year just closed. The unintellectual Many elevated Louis Napoleon to the Presidency, and France became a Republic only in name; hence followed the overthrow of Italian liberty ; noble Hungary was left helpless, while her despotic and barbarous foe took fresh courage-deriving also his fatal advantage from treachery; and the prospect of European freedom which opened so brilliantly upon us in 1848, was blighted. Should not this sad catastrophe of struggles so hopefully begun, teach us, more than ever, to labour earnestly for the increase of intelligence in our own fatherland-in order, first, that the demand for the franchise may be more speedily successful, by its being the universal demand of an intelligent people and, then, that the franchise when won, may be preserved unimpaired, by its being wisely exercised ? I know that many a young and earnest mind will give an affirmative response to this question.

What, then, can we do, in this year 1850, towards laying a sure and enduring foundation for our great enterprize-the enlightenment and enfranchisement of ALL? The old Mechanics’ Institutes, it is confessed by their best and worthiest supporters, have failed to accomplish their purpose: the political associations of the Working Classes have become almost lifeless. Is it the time to attempt the formation of a PROGRESS UNION, that shall combine efforts for the spread of intelligence with an united struggle for the franchise, and for the general amelioration of our political and social condition? Such a union, it seems to me, (but, by many of you reflecting upon it, the thought may be improved) might be created by these means :

1. Societies should be formed, having Mutual Instruction and Discussion Classes, Libraries, and weekly lectures : their rules should be free of all restriction as to the subjects of discourse or debate, or the character of the books or papers purchased; above all, their quarterly, monthly, or weekly

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