An Excursion to the Lakes in Westmoreland and Cumberland;: With a Tour Through Part of the Northern Counties, in the Years 1773 and 1774, Band 86

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J. Wilkie, No. 71, St. Paul's Churchyard, and W. Charnley, in Newcastle., 1776 - 382 Seiten
 

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Seite 130 - ... surface. I will now carry you to the top of a cliff, where if you dare approach the ridge, a new...
Seite 154 - Smooth to the shelving brink a copious flood Rolls fair and placid; where collected all, In one impetuous torrent, down the steep It thundering shoots, and shakes the country round. At first, an azure sheet, it rushes broad ; Then whitening by degrees, as prone it falls, And from the loud-resounding rocks below Dash'd in a cloud of foam, it sends aloft A hoary mist, and forms a ceaseless shower.
Seite 138 - Purfue my theme, and fight the fear of death. Here, like a fhepherd gazing from his hut, Touching his reed, or...
Seite 128 - I must add the frequent and bold projection of the cliffs into the lake, forming noble bays and promontories ; in other parts, they finely retire from it ; and often open in abrupt chasms or...
Seite 128 - ... picturesque forms. On the opposite shore you will find rocks and cliffs of stupendous height, hanging broken over the lake in horrible grandeur, some of them a thousand feet high, the woods climbing up their steep...
Seite 153 - ... where we were delighted with the noble objects which prefented themfelves to our view. — Around us was fpread a grove, formed of tall young oaks, afh, and birch trees, which gave an agreeable coolnefs and...
Seite 127 - Instead of a meagre rivulet, a noble living lake, ten miles round, of an oblong form, adorned with a variety of wooded islands. The rocks indeed of Dovedale are finely wild, pointed and irregular; but the hills are both little and unanimated, and the margin of the brook is poorly edged with weeds, morass, and brushwood. But at Keswick, you will on one...
Seite 189 - ... and near a mile in breadth, shining and bright as a mirror, we viewed the agreeable variety of the adjacent country ; to the right, woodlands and meadows, in many little peninsulas and promontories descended with easy slopes to the brink of the lake, where...
Seite 138 - Bleft be that hand divine which gently laid My heart at reft beneath this humble fhed. The world's a ftately bark, on dang'rous feas, With pleafure feen, but boarded at our peril : Here, on a...
Seite 145 - The water of Derwent-water is fubje& to violent agitations, and often without any apparent caufe, as was the cafe this day ; the weather was calm, yet the waves ran a great height, and the boat was tofied violently, with what is called a bottom wind.

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