Yorick's Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy, Bände 3-4

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R. Sammer, Bookseller., 1798 - 204 Seiten
 

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Seite 189 - When I went up, continued the corporal, into the lieutenant's room, which I did not do till the expiration of the ten minutes, he was lying in his bed, with his head raised upon his hand, with his elbow upon the pillow, and a clean white cambric handkerchief beside it.
Seite 180 - I can ask his son again: -Has he a son with him then? said my uncle Toby. — A boy, replied the landlord, of about eleven or twelve years of age; — but the poor creature has tasted almost as little as his father; he does nothing but mourn and lament for him night and day: He has not stirred from the bedside these two days.
Seite 186 - ... continued the Corporal, I thought it was proper to tell him I was Captain Shandy's servant, and that your honour (though a stranger) was extremely concerned for his father ; and that if there was any thing in your house or cellar, — (And thou mightst have added my purse too, said my uncle Toby), — he was heartily welcome to it.
Seite 186 - What could be the matter with me, an' please your honour ? Nothing in the world, Trim, said my uncle Toby, blowing his nose, but that thou art a good-natured fellow. When I gave him the toast, continued the Corporal, I thought it was proper to tell him I was Captain Shandy's servant, and that your honour (though a stranger) was extremely concerned for his father ; and that if there was any thing in your house or cellar, — (And thou mightst have added my purse too...
Seite 182 - ... twill be enough to give your honour your death, and bring on your honour's torment in your groin. I fear so, replied my uncle Toby; but I am not at rest in my mind, Trim, since the account the landlord has given me. I wish I had not known so much of this affair, — added my uncle Toby, — or that I had known more of it: How shall we manage it?
Seite 189 - Scripture, said my uncle Toby ; and I will show it thee to-morrow. In the mean time we may depend upon it, Trim, for our comfort, said my uncle Toby, that God Almighty is so good and just a Governor of the world that, if we have but done our duties in it, it will never be inquired into whether we have done them in a red coat or a black one.
Seite 185 - But alas! the poor gentleman will never get from hence, said the landlady to me, — for I heard the death-watch all night long ; and when he dies, the youth, his son, will certainly die with him ; for he is broken-hearted already. I was hearing this account...
Seite 196 - ... would have done it, and asked him how he did, how he had rested in the night, what was his complaint, where was his pain, and what he could do to help him ; and without giving him time to answer any one of...
Seite 185 - Poor youth ! said my uncle Toby ; he has been bred up from an infant in the army, and the name of a soldier, Trim, sounded in his ears like the name of a friend : I wish I had him here. I never in the longest march, said the Corporal, had so great a mind to my dinner, as I had to cry with him for company. What could be the matter with me, an...
Seite 183 - I despaired at first, said the Corporal, of being able to bring back your Honour any kind of intelligence concerning the poor sick Lieutenant. Is he in the army, then ? said my uncle Toby. He is, said the Corporal. And in what regiment ? said my uncle Toby. I'll tell your Honour, replied the Corporal, every thing straight forwards, as I learnt it.

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