Swords Against The Senate: The Rise Of The Roman Army And The Fall Of The Republic

Cover
Hachette Books, 05.11.2008 - 256 Seiten
In the first century B.C., Rome was the ruler of a vast empire. Yet at the heart of the Republic was a fatal flaw: a dangerous hostility between the aristocracy and the plebians, each regarding itself as the foundation of Rome's military power. Turning from their foreign enemies, Romans would soon be fighting Romans.Swords Against the Senate describes the first three decades of Rome's century-long civil war that transformed it from a republic to an imperial autocracy, from the Rome of citizen leaders to the Rome of decadent emperor thugs. As the republic came apart amid turmoil, Gaius Marius, the "people's general," rose to despotic power only to be replaced by the brutal dictator Sulla. The Roman army, once invincible against foreign antagonists, became a tool for the powerful, and the Roman Senate its foe.

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LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - Luftwaffe_Flak - LibraryThing

Very excellent look at the events that started the cracking of the Senate and the Republic of Rome. Mainly examines Marius and Sulla, does not go much into Caesar and Pompey etc. Vollständige Rezension lesen

LibraryThing Review

Nutzerbericht  - Garp83 - LibraryThing

It is a bit unfortunate for Erik Hildinger that I am reviewing his book, Swords Against the Senate: the Rise of the Roman Army and the Fall of the Republic, shortly after reading and reviewing Tom ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

III
1
IV
19
V
35
VI
45
VII
59
VIII
81
IX
97
X
111
XIII
155
XIV
167
XV
181
XVI
201
XVII
211
XVIII
213
XIX
225
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229

XI
125
XII
141

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Über den Autor (2008)

Erik Hildinger has written on ancient and medieval military history for a number of publications. He was a practicing lawyer for many years and now teaches at the University of Michigan. He lives in Ann Arbor.

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