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the critical rasures which are here discovered * The action of Hector, in lifting his infant in his arms, occasioned Pope much trouble; and at length the printed copy has a different reading.

I must not omit noticing, that the whole is on the back of a letter franked by Addison; which cover I have given at one corner of the plate.

The parts distinguished by Italics were rejected.

Thus having spoke, the illustrious chief of Troy Extends his eager arms to embrace his boy,

lovely Stretched his fond arms to seize the beauteous boy;

babe
The boy clung crying to his nurse's breast,
Scar'd at the dazzling helm and nodding crest.

each kind
With silent pleasure the fond parent smild,
And Hector hasten'd to relieve his child.
The glittering terrors

unbound, His radiant helmet from his brows unbrac'd,

* Dr. Johnson, in noticing the mss. of Milton, preserved at Cambridge, has made, with his usual force of language, the following observation : “ Such cliques show how excellence is acquired; what we hope ever to do with ease, we may learn first to do with diligence.”

M 2

ye

on the ground he And on the ground the glittering terror plac'd,

beamy And plac'd the radiant helmet on the ground, Then seiz'd the boy and raising him in air,

lifting Then fondling in his arms his infant heir,

dancing Thus to the gods addrest a father's prayer.

glory fills O thou, whose thunder shakes th' ethereal throne,

deathless And all

other

powers, protect my son! Like mine, this war, blooming youth with every virtue bless,

grace The shield and glory of the Trojan race ; Like mine his valour, and his just renown, Like mine his labours to defend the crown. Grant him, like me, to purchase just renown,

the Trojans To guard my country, to defend the crown: In arms like me, his country's war to wage, And rise the Hector of the future age! Against his country's foes the war to wage, And rise the Hector of the future age!

successful So when triumphant from the glorious toils Of hero's slain, he bears the reeking spoils,

Whole hosts may
AU Troy shall hail him, with desery'd acclaim,

own the son
And cry, this chief transcends his father's fame.
While pleas'd, amidst the general shouts of Troy,
His mother's conscious heart o'erflows with joy.

fondly
He said, and gazing o'er his consort's charms,
Restor'd his infant to her longing arms.

on her

on

Soft in her fragrant breast the babe she laid,
Prest to her heart, and with a smile survey'd;

to repose
Hush'd him to rest, and with a smile survey'd.

passion But soon the troubled pleasure mixt with rising fears,

dash'd with fear, The tender pleasure soon, chastised by fear, She mingled with the smile a tender tear.

The

passage appears thus in the printed work. I have marked in Italics the variations.

Thus having spoke, the illustrious chief of Troy
Stretch'd his fond arms to clasp the lovely boy.
The babe clung crying to his nurse's breast,
Scar'd at the dazzling helm and nodding crest.
With secret* pleasure each fond parent smild,
And Hector hasted to relieve his child,

* Silent in the ms. (observes a critical friend) is greatly superior to secret, as it appears in the printed work.

The glittering terrors from his brows unbound,
And placed the beaming helmet on the ground;
Then kiss'd the child, and lifting high in air,
Thus to the gods preferr'd a father's prayer :

O thou, whose glory fills th' ethereal throne,
And all ye deathless powers, protect my son!
Grant him like me to purchase just renown,
To guard the Trojans, to defend the crown ;
Against his country's foes the war to wage,
And rise the Hector of the future age !
So when, triumphant from successful toils
Of heroes slain, he bears the reeking spoils,
Whole hosts may hail him, with deserv'd acclaim,
And say, this chief transcends his father's fame:
While pleas'd amidst the general shouts of Troy,
His mother's conscious heart o’erflows with joy.

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He spoke ; and fondly gazing on her charms
Restor’d the pleasing burden to her arms :
Soft on her fragrant breast the babe she laid,
Hush'd to repose, and with a smile survey'd.
The troubled pleusure soon chastis’d by fear,
She mingled with the smile a tender tear.

LITERARY FASHIONS.

THERE is such a thing as Literary Fashion, and prose and verse have been regulated by the same caprice that cuts our coats, and cocks our

hats. Dr. Kippis, who had a taste for literary history, has observed that “ Dodsley's Economy of Human Life' long received the most extravagant applause, from the supposition that it was written by a celebrated nobleman; an instance of the power of Literary Fashion ; the history of which, as it hath appeared in various ages and countries, and as it hath operated with respect to the different objects of science, learning, art, and taste, would form a work that might be highly instructive and entertaining."

The favourable reception of Dodsley's “ Economy of Human Life” produced a whole family of economies ; it was soon followed by a second part, the gratuitous ingenuity of one of those officious imitators, whom an original author never cares to thank. Other ceconomies trod on the heels of each other.

For some memoranda towards a history of literary fashions, the following may be arranged :

At the restoration of letters in Europe, commentators and compilers were at the head of the literati; translators followed, who enriched themselves with their spoils on the commentators. When in the progress of modern literature, writers aimed to rival the great authors of antiquity, the different styles, in their servile imitations, clashed together; and parties were formed, who fought

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