Hooker's Journal of Botany and Kew Garden Miscellany, Band 9

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Sir William Jackson Hooker
Reeve, Benham, and Reeve, 1857
 

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Seite 314 - ... cannot be properly appreciated without an extensive knowledge of plants. But if we endeavour to seize the floating conceptions furnished by common experience, and to fix and define them by a course of exact practical observation of the more accessible characters of plants (showing the relations of these as they occur in different divisions of the Vegetable Kingdom), we place the student in a position which enables him to proceed at once with an inquiry into the peculiarities of the plants he...
Seite 175 - Some idea of the appearance of this plant may be gained by imagining a vast number of Ananas, or Pine-apple plants, without fruit, so thickly crowded together as to cover the sides, and even the middle, of the stream, standing seldom higher than three or four feet above the surface, but generally under water, whenever the river swells above its ordinary height. The stems which support them are of the thickness of a man's arm; black, and of a very tough and spongy substance; generally simple, though...
Seite 125 - Prodromus ; or, an enumeration of South African indigenous plants used as remedies by the colonists of the Cape of Good Hope.
Seite 213 - When we had gone on about an hour and a quarter, or an hour and a half, the fog disappeared like magic, and all was sunshine below, about one thousand feet from the top I should say. Most provoking!
Seite 124 - Index filicum; a synopsis, with characters, of the genera, and an enumeration of the species of ferns, with synonymes, references, &c.
Seite 175 - Palmiet by the colonists, and from which this one derives its name. Some notion of the appearance of these plants may be gained by imagining a vast number of Ananas, or Pine-apple plants, without fruit, so thickly crowded together as to cover the sides and even the middle of the stream, standing seldom higher than three or four feet above the surface, but generally under water whenever the river swells above its ordinary height. The stems which support them are of the thickness of a man's arm, black,...
Seite 55 - Eendus,' 1856, p. 538, and republished by Dr. Seemann in ' Hooker's Journal of Botany and Kew Miscellany ' for 1857, ix. p. 53), has the following passage : — comparably less than that of the flowers. These fruits contained well-formed seeds. In November of the same year I had fifteen of them sown in a hothouse ; all came up very well. In 1855 this female Bryony fructified as it did in the preceding year, and in the same proportion as it had done in 1856. I have examined the flowers many times,...
Seite 175 - ... than three or four feet above the surface, but generally under water, whenever the river swells above its ordinary height. The stems which support them are of the thickness of a man's arm; black, and of a very tough and spongy substance; generally simple, though not rarely divided into one or two branches. They rise up from the bottom, not often in an upright posture, but inclined by the force of the current. They have very much the growth of Dragon-trees (DractBnd), or of some palms, from which...
Seite 283 - CULTIVATED FERNS, OR A CATALOGUE OF EXOTIC AND INDIGENOUS FERNS CULTIVATED IN BRITISH GARDENS / Smith. J - 7262 1857 - 9 - ne IDC THE CUMULATED INDEX KEWENSIS / Royal Botanical Gardens.
Seite 276 - Having laid before the Lords Commissioners of her Majesty's Treasury your letter of the 13th ultimo, addressed to the Earl of Clarendon, requesting, on behalf of the New York, Newfoundland, and London Telegraph Company, certain privileges and protection in regard to the line of telegraph which it is proposed to establish between Newfoundland and Ireland, I am directed by their lordships...

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