The Speeches of Charles Phillips, Esq., Delivered at the Bar, and on Various Public Occasions in Ireland and England

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W. Simpkin and R. Marshall, 1822 - 304 Seiten
 

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Seite 94 - AH ! who can tell how hard it is to climb The steep where Fame's proud temple shines afar; Ah! who can tell how many a soul sublime Has felt the influence of malignant star, And waged with Fortune an eternal war; Check'd by the scoff of Pride, by Envy's frown, And Poverty's unconquerable bar, In life's low vale remote has pined alone, Then dropt into the grave, unpitied and unknown...
Seite 106 - The glorious, pious and immortal memory of the great and good King William — not forgetting Oliver Cromwell, who assisted in redeeming us from Popery, slavery, arbitrary power, brass money and wooden shoes.
Seite 186 - Such a medley of contradictions, and, at the same time, such an individual consistency, were never united in the same character. A royalist, a republican, and an emperor; a Mohammedan, a Catholic...
Seite 184 - But if his fortune was great, his genius was transcendent ; decision flashed upon his councils ; and it was the same to decide and to perform. To inferior intellects his combinations appeared perfectly impossible, his plans perfectly impracticable, ; but, in his hands, simplicity marked their development and success vindicated their adoption.
Seite 43 - Liberty unsheathed his sword, necessity stained, victory returned it. If he had paused here, history might have doubted what station to assign him, whether at the head of her citizens or her soldiers, 'her heroes or her patriots. But the last glorious act crowns his career, and banishes all hesitation. Who, like Washington, after having emancipated...
Seite 43 - ... perfection of every master. As a general he marshalled the peasant into a veteran, and supplied by discipline the absence of experience. As a statesman, he enlarged the policy of the cabinet into the most comprehensive system of general advantage ; and such was the wisdom of his views, and the philosophy of his counsels, that to the soldier and the statesman, he almost added the character of the sage.
Seite 183 - ... not promulgate ; in the hope of a dynasty, he upheld the crescent ; for the sake of a divorce, he bowed before the cross : the orphan of St. Louis, he became the adopted child of the republic...
Seite 137 - Heaven is saintly chastity, that, when a soul is found sincerely so, a thousand. liveried angels lackey her, driving far off each thing of sin and guilt, and, in clear dream and solemn vision, tell her of things that no gross ear can hear; till oft converse with heavenly habitants begin to cast a beam on the outward shape, the unpolluted temple of the mind, and turns it by degrees to the soul's essence, till all be made immortal.
Seite 39 - Who can deny that its gigantic advancement offers a field for the most rational conjecture ! At the end of the very next century, if she proceeds as she seems to promise, what a wondrous spectacle may she not exhibit ! Who shall say for what purpose mysterious Providence may not have designed her ! Who shall say that when in its follies or its crimes the old world may...
Seite 42 - Caesar was merciful, Scipio was continent, Hannibal was patient; but it was reserved for Washington to blend them all in one, and, like the lovely masterpiece of the Grecian artist, to exhibit, in one glow of associated beauty, the pride of every model and the perfection of every master.

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