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MEDICAL REPOSITORY,

COMPREHENDINO

ORIGINAL ESSAYS AND INTELLIGENCE

RELATIVE TO

MEDICINE, CHEMISTRY, NATURAL HISTORY,
AGRICULTURE, GEOGRAPHY,

AND THE ARTS;
MORE ESPECIALLY AS THEY ARE

CULTIVATED IN AMERICA;

AND

A REVIEW OF AMERICAN PUBLICATIONS

ON

MEDICINE,

AND THE

AUXILIARY BRANCHES OF SCIENCE.

CONDUCTED BY
SAMUEL LATHAM MITCHILL, M.D.F.R.S. Ed.
Professor of Natural History in the University of New York, Senator in the Congress
of the United States, Fellow of the Philosophical Societies of Philadelphia,

Boston, Marseilles, Leghorn, &c.

AND
EDWARD MILLER, M. D.
Resident Physician for the City of New York, Professor of the Practice

of Physic in the University of New-York, &c.

Te deceat omni literarum genere imbutum cum Romano consule interdum

a republica ad academiam secedere ; et relicto senatu, philosophos audire in
Tusculano disserentes, cum regimine politico conferre æconomiam animalem,
et perspectis principum consiliis, in naturæ mysteria inquirere.

Mayow's Address to Coventry.

SECOND HEXADE.

VOL. VI.

NEW-YORK:
Printed and sold by COLLINS Ó PERKINS, Printers to the New York College of
Physicians and Surgeons, and to the New-York Hospital, No. 189, Pearl-street:

Sold also by T. 67. Swords, New-York; T. Dobson, Philadelphia ;
E. Corton, Boston; and Marchant, Willington Co. Charleston.

1809.

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Diftrial of New-York, f.

Béit REMEMBERED that on the sixth day of

E
June, in the thirty-third year of the Independence

of the United States of America, Samuel Latham
(L. S.) Mitchill and Edward Miller, of the said District,

hath deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whercof they claim as authors, in the words

and figures following, to wit: “ The Medical Repo

fitory, comprebending Original Ejays and Intelligence relative to Medicine, Chemistry, Natural History, Agriculture, Geograpby and the Arts; more especially as they are cultivated in America; and a Revicau of American Publications on Medicine, and the Auxiliary Branches of Science. Conducted by Samuel Latbam Mitcbill, M. D. F. R. S. Éd. Profesor of Natural History in the University of New-York, Senator in the Congrefs of the United States, Fellow of the Philosophical Society of Philadelphia, Bojan, Murfilles, Leghorn, &c. and Edward Miller, M. D. Resident Physician for tbe City of New-York, Professor of the Praltice of Physic in the University of New-York, &c. Te deceat omni literarum genere imbutum cum Romano consule interdum a republica ad academiam fecedere ; et relicto fenatu, philofophos audire in Tusculano diferentes, cum regimine politico conferre aconomiam animalem, et perspectis principum confiliis, in nature myfteria inquirerc.' Mugou's Address to Coventry. Second Hexade. Vol. VI.”

IN CONFORMITY to the Act of the Congress of the United States, cntitled, “ An Act for the Encouragement of Learning, by securing the Copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of Tuch Copies, during the times therein mentioned;" and also to an Ad, entitled, “ An Act fupplementary to an Ad, entitled, An Ad for the Encouragement of Learn. ing, by securing the Copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the Authors and Proprietors of such Copies, during the times therein mentioned, and extending the Benefits thereof to the Arts of Designing, Engraving, and Etching Historical and other Prints."

CHARLES CLINTON,
Clerk of the Diflria of New-loork.

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PRE FACE.

HAVING arrived at the close of the second Hexade, comprising a total amount of twelve Volumes from the commencement in 1797, the Editors conceive themselves bound in duty to present to the reader an account of the existing state of the work, and of the resources they still possess for the future continuance of it.

How far the merit or utility of the Medical Repository may entitle it to the support of the community, is a question which it would ill become the Editors to discuss. They may be permitted, however, to observe, without imputation of arrogance, that the duration of twelve years, (unexampled in the periodical publications of a scientific or literary kind in this country) the repeated editions which several portions of the work have undergone, the prolific sources of the materials with which its pages have been steadily filled, the number of publications since commenced on a similar plan, and finally, the great accession to the number of subscribers lately gained, all serve to demonstrate that the public are not yet weary in this exertion of patronage, and that the objects held up to view in the original proposals are still considered, both with respect to their importance, and the degree of their attainment, as deserving the attention of men of science in the several parts of the United States.

The Editors do not attempt to disguise the satisfaction they experience in the reflection of having first set the example of this mode of medical instruction in America, and having been enabled to prosecute the plan, as originally form. ed, without interruption, through all the doubtful and perilVol. VI.

b

ous periods of its infancy, to the present stage of vigour and maturity. They willingly acknowledge that much of the value of the work, and much of its acceptance with the public, have been owing to the peculiarities of the times in which it appeared. The period in which we live has not only been rendered memorable by the rise and fall of empires, and by every variety of political commotion and calamity; but the same period also has been remarkably distinguished by the occurrence of malignant and fatal epidemics, by animated disquisitions concerning their origin, propagation and treatment, and by brilliant discoveries in medicine and other collateral branches of knowledge. As it was the duty of the Editors to state these discoveries, and to draw the attention of the public to them by all the means in their power, the Medical Repository undoubtedly derived much of its cir. culation from the importance of the matter of which it thus became the vehicle. The instrument is often honoured by the subject on which it is employed. While such interesting improvements are recorded and borne along the stream of time, it is one of the flattering distinctions enjoyed by the humblest followers in the train of Science, that they likewise

« attendant sail, Pursue the triumph and partake the gale." At no period since the commencement of this work, have the Editors found the quantity of materials in their possession more abundant, or the value of them more imperiously demanding a continuance of their editorial exertions, than at the present time. Their correspondence, both domestic and foreign, never afforded a better prospect of supplying communications to any desirable extent. The benevolence and zeal of their friends, reinforced, if they are not too sanguine, by the approbation and good will of the public, never inspired more assurance of efficient and persevering support. And the pleasure they derive themselves, from contributing their endeavours in the cause of American Science, has not been experienced in a higher degree on any former occasion. So far, therefore, from sinking into weariness or languor, after the toil of twelve industrious years, or being deterred by the prospect of a renewal of it, the Editors approach the beginning of the third Hexade with confidence and satisfaction; and relying somewhat on the experience and habits of practised labourers, they indulge the hope of rendering the Medical Repository, hereafter, more worthy than ever of the public protection.

TITLES

OP THE

ESSAYS AND REVIEWS

CONTAINED IN THE

SIXTH VOLUME OF THE SECOND HEXADE;

OR THE TWELFTH IN THE WHOLE.

No. I. 1. REMARKS on the Functions of the Stomach, as

elucidated by observations and experiments made upon a Woman, into whose stomach there was an opening through the integuments of the abdomen. By Ben. jamin Waterhouse, M. Ď. and Professor of Natural History at Cambridge, &c. with a translation of part of Jacob Helm's publication on the subject, from the German by Samuel L. Mitchill.

p. 1 I. Description of the Influenza of 1807, as it appear

ed in West Tennessee. By Dr. Thomas G. Watkins, of Nashville.

5 III. A brief History of the Influenza, which prevailed

in 1807. By Shadrach Ricketson, Physician in New-York.

12 IV. An Essay on the Temperature of the Seasons in

different years; and on the course of the Winds, particularly upon the Atlantic Ocean, in the Northern temperate Zone, and the Countries adjoining that Ocean. By Mark Leavenworth, Esq. of Paris.

(Continued from Vol. XI. p. 374, and concluded) 23 V. Observations on the Character and Constitution of

the Blood ; with a Theory of Gout. By John Brick: ell, M. D. of Savannah.

45 VI. Remarks on the Manners of the Indians living

high up the River Missouri. Translated from a French manuscript Memoir written by Mr. Jean Baptiste Trudeau. By Samuel L. Mitchill.

52 Reviewsof the Transactions of the New-York Society for

the Promotion of Useful Arts, p. 57 ; of Horne's Concise

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