Select orations of Cicero with an English commentary and historical, geographical, and legal indexes

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Harper, 1851 - 518 Seiten
 

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Seite xxix - Dr. B. The attendants, as soon as the soldiers appeared, prepared themselves for action, being resolved to defend their master's life at the hazard of their own ; but Cicero commanded them to set down the litter in which they were conveying him, and to make no resistance...
Seite 52 - Quare quis tandem me reprehendat aut quis mihi iure suscenseat si, quantum ceteris ad suas res obeundas, quantum ad festos dies ludorum celebrandos, quantum ad alias voluptates et ad ipsam requiem animi et corporis conceditur temporum, quantum alii tribuunt tempestivis conviviis, quantum denique alveolo, quantum pilae, tantum mihi egomet ad haec studia recolenda sumpsero?
Seite 54 - Atque sic a summis hominibus eruditissimisque accepimus, ceterarum rerum studia et doctrina et praeceptis et arte constare; poe'tam natura ipsa valere et mentis viribus excitari et quasi divino quodam spiritu inflari. Qua re suo iure noster ille Ennius sanctos appellat poe'tas, quod quasi deorum aliquo dono atque munere commendati nobis esse videantur.
Seite 163 - A silver eagle, with expanded wings, on the top of a spear, sometimes holding a thunderbolt in its claws, with the figure of a small chapel above it, Dio. xl. 18., was the common standard of the legion, at least after the time of Marius, for before that the figures of other animals were used, Plin.
Seite 7 - Servi mehercle mei si me isto pacto metuerent, ut te metuunt omnes cives tui, domum meam relinquendam putarem : tu tibi urbem non arbitraris ? et, si me meis civibus...
Seite 188 - bosom-friend," is to be explained by the Roman custom of reclining at meals, already alluded to in a previous part of this commentary (note 14, page 16.) As the guests lay on the couch, the head of the second was in a line with the breast of the first, so that if he wanted to speak with him, especially, if the thing was to be secret, he was obliged to lean upon his bosom, or, as Pliny expresses it,
Seite 151 - There he threw back his robe, and showed part of the coat of mail, on purpose to point out his danger. The people were incensed, and immediately gathered about him ; the consequence of which was, that Catiline was thrown out again, and Silanus and Murena chosen consuls.

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