The History of France ...

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Longman, Brown, Green, Longmans, & Roberts, 1886

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Seite 97 - Paris , but his wife, a courageous and beautiful woman, who is said to have had the courage of a man and the heart of a lion...
Seite 212 - ... received a gun-shot through the reins. The gallant chevalier, feeling his wound mortal, caused himself to be placed in a sitting posture beneath a tree, his face to the enemy, and his sword fixed in guise of a cross before him. The constable Bourbon, who led the imperialists, soon came up to the dying Bayard, and expressed his compassion. " Weep not for me," said the chevalier,
Seite 134 - ... mortal baseness allied with our aspirations after immortality. It could not but occur to Joan, that she might be the object of these prophecies ; it was but a short and flattering step for her credulity to suppose, to believe, that she was. The idea was bright and dazzling ; — she gazed upon it ; — it became the object of her constant meditation. When we see that ill success or contradictory events can seldom dissipate illusion in such cases, how strongly must her successes have confirmed...
Seite 33 - Feast days were included amongst those dtevoted to peace, as well as the long intervals of fast and penitence which occur in the Romish church. The persons of all professing* a religious life were rendered sacred ; and, what perhaps shows the humanity and wisdom of the measure more than any of the regulations, all implements of husbandry were put under the protection of the truce.
Seite 309 - Philip communicated the views of his master, completed in the mind of Charles his hatred of the reformation, and instructed him concerning the means by which it might be eventually crushed. The edict of Roussillon*, which appeared while the court was in the south, imposed new restrictions on the toleration granted by that of Amboise; so that, as Pasquier observes, "edicts took more from the protestants in peace than force could take from them in war." The huguenots, therefore, despairing of impartiality...
Seite 43 - The monarejh delivered his grandchildren, the daughters of the Count of Breteuil, and Harenc tore out their eyes, and cut off their noses, in execution of the vengeance that he deemed just. The principal feat of the war betwixt Henry and Louis was produced by accident. The two kings, each at the head of some five hundred knights, encountered one another in the plain of Brenneville. An engagement ensued, in which Louis was routed, and most of the French made prisoners. Only three were killed: to such...
Seite 44 - ... south. During a war carried on about the same time against Thibaud, Count of Champagne, an accident occurred, which had a marked effect upon the future conduct and character of Louis the Young. He had taken by storm the castle of Vitry, and set fire to it. The flames chanced to catch the neighbouring church, into which the population had crowded, to preserve themselves from the fury of the soldiery. It appears that they had no means of escape. Thirteen hundred men, women, and children, perished...
Seite 29 - The priesthood expected it to contain a magnificent donation, and were not little surprised and disappointed to find it to contain but a hymn of the monarch's composition. The piety of Robert was most exemplary. He was anxious to save his subjects from the crime of perjury : the means he took were, to abstract privately the holy relics from the cases which contained them, and on which people were sworn. He substituted an ostrich's egg, as an innocent object, incapable of taking vengeance on the false...
Seite 348 - Henry was engaged in opening them, the friar stabbed him in the lower part of the stomach. The king exclaimed, " The wicked monk ! he has killed me ;" and, drawing out the knife, struck Clement with it. The attendants rushed in at the moment, and slew the assassin. At first the wound was not considered mortal ; but on the following day its fatal effects became evident. Henry of Bourbon was summoned to the dying monarch, who declared him his successor ; but warned him, that he would never reign over...

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