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Bareau of navigation.

For nautical and astronomical instruments, for nautical books, maps and charts, and sailing directions, and for repairs of instruments for vessels of war, ten thousand dollars.

For books for libraries for vessels of war, and for books and stationery for naval apprentices, four thousand five hundred dollars.

For binnacles, pedestals, and other appurtenances of ships' compasses, to be made in the yards, three thousand dollars.

For bunting and other materials for flags, and for making and repairing flags of all kinds for the navy, seven thousand and five hundred

dollars.

For navy signals other than signal flags, namely, signal-lanterns, lights, rockets, and apparatus of all kinds for signal purposes, for drawings and engravings for signal-books, six thousand dollars.

For logs, log lines, log reels, log paper, and sand-glasses, for lead, lead reels, lead lines, armings for leads and other sounding apparatus, and for running lights, (side and head lanterns prescribed by law,) eight thousand dollars.

For musical instruments for vessels of war, one thousand dollars.

For commanders' and navigators' stationery for vessels of war, five thousand dollars.

For oil for vessels of war, other than for engineer department, fifty thousand dollars.

For local and foreign pilotage for vessels of war, sixty thousand dollars.

For lamps and lanterns of all kinds for binnacles, standard-compasses, and tops, for lamps for cabins, wardroom, and other quarters for officers, and for decks, holds, and storerooms, and for lamp-wicks, chimneys, shades, and other appendages, six thousand dollars.

For freight and transportation of navigation materials, instruments, books, and stores, postage on public letters, telegraphing on public business, advertising for proposals, packing boxes and material, blank-books, forms, and stationery at navigation offices, and contingent expenses, ten

thousand dollars. Naval acade- For expenses of naval academy, viz. my.

For pay of professors and others, seventy-six thousand seven hundred and six dollars.

For pay of watchmen and others, forty-five thousand two hundred and ninety-four dollars.

For contingent expenses, sixty-three thousand four hundred and fifty dollars:

For necessary repairs of quarters, ten thousand dollars.

For support of department of steam enginery, and for payment of

mechanics and laborers, five thousand dollars. Naval obser- For expenses of naval observatory, viz. vatory.

For wages of one instrument-maker, one messenger, one porter, and three watchmen; for keeping grounds in order, and repairs to buildings and enclosures ; for fuel, light, and office furniture, and for stationery, chemicals for batteries, postage, and freight, ten thousand six hundred dollars.

For incidental expenses, five hundred dollars.
For salary of clerk, one thousand five hundred dollars.

For salary of three aids, four thousand dollars.
American For preparing for publication the American Nautical Almanac, namely:
Nautical Alma-

For pay of computers, fifteen thousand dollars. nac.

For pay of clerk, one thousand two hundred dollars. Visitors to na.

For payment of expenses of visitors to the naval academy, two thouval academy. sand dollars.

Bureau of or- Bureau of Ordnance. — For guns, gun-carriages, shot, shell, magazine dnance.

and laboratory stores, and equipments of all kinds; for gunpowder, small

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arms, equipments, and ammunition ; for fuel and materials necessary in Bureau of ordcarrying on the mechanical branches of the ordnance department at the navy yards and stations, two hundred and fifty thousand dollars.

For the necessary repairs of the magazine at Chelsea ; for the dwellings at the nitre depot, Malden ; for repairs to buildings on ordnance dock, and also repairs to tugs and lighters, and for repairs of ordnance dock at Ellis Island, New York; for repairs of magazine at Fort Mifflin ; for repairing crane and wharf at Norfolk, and for repairs of magazine at Mare Island, fourteen thousand five hundred dollars.

For pay of the superintendents and the civil establishment at the several navy yards under this bureau, fifteen thousand dollars.

Bureau of Construction and Repairs. — For pay of superintendents of construction and the civil establishment at the several navy yards under this bureau,

and repairs; thirty-nine thousand dollars.

Bureau of Steam Engineering. For pay of the superintendents and of steam enthe civil establishment at the several navy yards under this bureau, gineeringi twenty-four thousand dollars.

For stores and materials, tools, repairs of machinery of steamers, boilers, instruments, and labor at navy yards, and repairs of the machinery, and purchase of stores and materials for vessels of squadrons on foreign stations ; and for transportation of materials, six hundred and fifty thousand dollars. Bureau of Provisions and Clothing. - For

pay

of the civil establish- of provisions ment at the several navy yards under this bureau, and at the naval asy

and clothing; lum, twenty-six thousand dollars.

For provisions and clothing, one million five hundred thousand dollars.

To meet the demands upon the bureau for freight and transportation of stores, for candles, fuel; for tools and repairing same at eight inspections ; for books and blanks ; for stationery; for furniture and repairs of same in offices of paymasters and inspectors; for telegrams and postage; tolls and ferriages ; and for ice, one hundred thousand dollars.

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. — For necessary repairs and improvements of hospitals and appendages, including roads, wharves, walls, of medicine Outhouses, sidewalks, fences, gardens, farms, painting, glazing, black and surgery. smiths', plumbers', and masons' work; for furniture, thirty thousand dollars.

For pay of the civil establishment under this bureau, at the several navy hospitals and navy yards, sixty thousand dollars.

Marine Corps. — For pay of officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, clerks, messengers, steward, nurse, and servants ; for rations and clothing for officers' servants, additional rations to officers for five years' service; for undrawn clothing, one hundred and seventy thousand dollars. For provisions, one hundred thousand dollars.

Provisions, For clothing, one hundred thousand dollars.

clothing, fuel. For fuel, ten thousand dollars. For military stores, viz. Pay of mechanics; repair of arms; purchase Military of accoutrements; ordnance stores, flags, drums, fifes, and other instruments, five thousand dollars.

For transportation of officers, their servants, troops, and for expenses Transportaof recruiting, twelve thousand dollars.

tion. For repair of barracks, and for rent of offices where there are no public Repair of bar. buildings, ten thousand dollars.

For contingencies, viz. Freight ; ferriage; toll; cartage; wharfage; Contingencies. purchase and repair of boats; compensation of judge advocates ; per diem for attending courts-martial, and courts of inquiry, and for constant labor; house-rent in lieu of quarters, and commutation for quarters to officers on ship-board; burial of deceased marines; printing, stationery, postage, telegraphing; apprehension of deserters; oil, candles, gas; re

Marino corps.

stores.

Marine corps. pairs of gas and water-fixtures ; water rent, forage, straw, barrack

furniture; furniture for officers' quarters; bed sacks, wrapping paper, oil cloth, crash, rope, twine, spades, shovels, axes, picks, carpenters' tools ; keep of a horse for the messenger; repairs to fire-engines ; purchase and repair of engine hose; purchase of lumber for benches, mess-tables, bunks; repairs to public carryall; purchase and repair of harness ; purchase and repair of handcarts and wheelbarrows ; scavengering; purchase and repair of galleys, cooking stoves, ranges; stoves where there are no grates; gravel for parade grounds; repair of pumps; furniture for staff and commanding officers' offices; brushes, brooms, buckets, pav.

ing, and for other purposes, seventy-five thousand dollars. Number of en Sec. 2. And be ii further enacted, That the number of persons aulisted persons in thorized to be enlisted into the navy of the United States, including seamen, 8,600 men. ordinary seamen, landsmen, and mechanics, and including apprentices and

boys, is hereby fixed and established at eight thousand five hundred, and

no more. Certain unex Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That all unexpended appropriations pended approan existing on the first day of July next, for any of the several heads of

to be carried to sur appropriation provided for in this act, shall be carried to the surplus fund, plus fund, unless, &c.

unless the same is necessary to pay expenditures made during the current fiscal year, or unless the same is necessary to execute contracts made

before said date. Secretary of Sec. 4. And be it further enacted, That the Secretary of the Treasury next annual esti- is hereby directed in his next annual estimates of appropriations to state mates to state all the balances of appropriations made prior to the present session of balances of ap. Congress, for each branch of the public service, and remaining unex

, &c.

pended on the first day of July next, and designate the amounts necessary to execute contracts or pay expenditures properly chargeable to each of such balances.

APPROVED, June 17, 1868.

p. 428.

41.

June 22, 1868. CHAP. LXIX. - An Act to admit the State of Arkansas to Representation in Congress.

Preamble. Whereas the people of Arkansas, in pursuance of the provisions of an 1867, ch. 163. Vol. xiv.

act entitled “ An act for the more efficient government of the rebel Ante, pp. 2, 14, States,” passed March second, eighteen hundred and sixty-seven, and the

acts supplementary thereto, have framed and adopted a constitution of State government, which is republican, and the legislature of said State has duly ratified the amendment to the Constitution of the United States proposed by the Thirty-ninth Congress, and known as article fourteen: Therefore,

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United Arkansas ad- States of America in Congress assembled, That the State of Arkansas is mitted to representation in

entitled and admitted to representation in Congress as one of the States Congress. of the Union upon the following fundamental condition : That the conFundamental

stitution of Arkansas shall never be so amended or changed as to deprive any citizen or class of citizens of the United States of the right to vote who are entitled to vote by the constitution herein recognized, except as & punishment for such crimes as are now felonies at common law, whereof they shall have been duly convicted, under laws equally applicable to all the inhabitants of said State: Provided, That any alteration of said constitution prospective in its effect may be made in regard to the time and place of residence of voters.

SCHUYLER COLFAX,

Speaker of the House of Representatives. B. F. WADE.

President of the Senate pro tempore.

condition.

Arkansas.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES U. S.,

June 20, 1868. The President of the United States having returned to the House of Representatives, in which it originated, the bill entitled " An act to admit the State of Arkansas to representation in Congress," with his objections thereto, the House of Representatives proceeded, in pursuance of the Constitution, to reconsider the same; and

Resolved, That the said bill do pass, two thirds of the House of Representatives agreeing to pass the same. Attest:

EDWD. MCPHERSON,

Clerk H. R. U. S.

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IN SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES,

June 22, 1868. The Senate having proceeded, in pursuance of the Constitution, to reconsider the bill entitled “ An act to admit the State of Arkansas to representation in Congress,” returned to the House of Representatives by the President of the United States, with his objections, and sent by the House of Representatives to the Senate, with the message of the President returning the bill :

Resolved, That the bill do pass, two thirds of the Senate agreeing to pass the same Attest:

GEO. C. GORHAM,

Secretary of the Senate.

CHAP. LXX. - An Act to admit the States of North Carolina, South Carolina, Louisi: June 25, 1868.

ana, Georgia, Alabama, and Florida, to Representation in Congress. WHEREAS the people of North Carolina, South Carolina, Louisiana, Preamble. Georgia, Alabama, and Florida have, in pursuance of the provisions of 1967, ch. 168: an act, entitled “ An act for the more efficient government of the rebel Ante, pp. 2, 14, States," passed March second, eighteen hundred and sixty-seven, and the 41. acts supplementary thereto, framed constitutions of State government which are republican, and have adopted said constitutions by large majorities of the votes cast at the elections held for the ratification or rejection of the same: Therefore,

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That each of the States of North CaroNorth Carolina, South Carolina, Louisiana, Georgia, Alabama, and lina, South CarFlorida, shall be entitled and admitted to representation in Congress as a Georgia, AlaState of the Union when the legislature of such State shall have duly bama, and Floriratified the amendment to the Constitution of the United States proposed ted to represenby the Thirty-ninth Congress, and known as article fourteen, upon the tation in Confollowing fundamental conditions: That the constitutions of neither of gress, when, &o.

Conditions. said States shall ever be so amended or changed as to deprive any citizen Constitutions or class of citizens of the United States of the right to vote in said State, not to be so

changed as, &c. who are entitled to vote by the constitution thereof herein recognized, except as a punishment for such crimes as are now felonies at common law, whereof they shall have been duly convicted under laws equally applicable to all the inhabitants of said State : Provided, That any altera- What alteration of said constitution may be made with regard to the time and place tions may be of residence of voters; and the State of Georgia shall only be entitled Further condiand admitted to representation upon this further fundamental condition : tion to the adthat the first and third subdivisions of section seventeen of the fifth article mission of Geor

gia. of the constitution of said State, except the proviso to the first subdivision, shall be null and void, and that the general assembly of said State by solemn public act shall declare the assent of the State to the foregoing fundamental condition.

First meeting Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That if the day fixed for the first of the legislatures of such meeting of the legislature of either of said States by the constitution or States.

ordinance thereof shall have passed or bave so nearly arrived before the passage of this act that there shall not be time for the legislature to assemble at the period fixed, such legislature shall convene at the end of twenty days from the time this act takes effect, unless the governor elect

shall sooner convene the same. Pirst section

Sec. 3. And be it further enacted, That the first section of this act shall of this act when take effect as to each State, except Georgia, when such State shall, by its to other States; legislature, duly ratify article fourteen of the amendments to the Consti

tution of the United States, proposed by the Thirty-ninth Congress, and when as to as to the State of Georgia when it shall in addition give the assent of Georgia.

said State to the fundamental condition hereinbefore imposed upon the Proceedings same; and thereupon the officers of each State duly elected and qualified thereupon. under the constitution thereof shall

be inaugurated without delay; but no Who not eli- person prohibited from holding under the United States, or under gible to office.

any State, by section three of the proposed amendment to the Constitution of the United States, known as article fourteen, shall be deemed eligible

to any office in either of said States, unless relieved from disability as Duty of Presi- provided in said amendment; and it is hereby made the duty of the dent

as to pro- President within ten days after receiving official information of the ratificlaiming ratification, &c.

cation of said amendment by the legislature of either of said States to issue a proclamation announcing that fact.

SCHUYLER COLFAX,

Speaker of the House of Representatives. B. F. WADE,

President of the Senate pro tempore.

S.,}

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, U. S.,

June 25, 1868. The President of the United States, having returned to the House of Representatives, in which it originated, the bill entitled “ An act to admit the States of North Carolina, South Carolina, Louisiana, Georgia, Alabama, and Florida to representation in Congress," with his objections thereto, the House of Representatives proceeded, in pursuance of the Constitution, to reconsider the same; and

Resolved, That the said bill do pass, two thirds of the House of Representatives agreeing to pass the same. Attest:

EDWD. MCPHERSON,

Clerk H. R. U. S.

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June 25, 1868. The Senate having proceeded, in pursuance of the Constitution, to reconsider the bill entitled "An act to adinit the States of North Carolina, South Carolina, Louisiana, Georgia, Alabama, and Florida to representation in Congress," returned to the House of Representatives by the President of the United States, with his objections, and sent by the House of Representatives to the Senate, with the message of the President returning the bill :

Resolved, Thate the bill do pass, two thirds of the Senate agreeing to pass the same. Attest:

GEO. C. GORHAM,

Secretary of the Senate.

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