The life of Frederick the second, king of prussia.2 vols, Band 1

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1832
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Seite 454 - Déjà l'Apollon de la France S'achemine à sa décadence : Venez briller à votre tour; Élevez-vous s'il brille encore ; Ainsi le couchant d'un beau jour Promet une plus belle aurore.
Seite 402 - ... not receive the water till after the miller had first made use of it. It is true, the count, for the purpose of irrigating his meadows, had made new channels for the stream, and thus, by increasing the rapidity of its descent, had left the original bed lower than was convenient for the purposes of the miller, so that those persons who made their report to Frederic were correct in stating that it was the count's proceedings which had injured the miller. At the same time, the judges were entirely...
Seite 282 - With unexpected legions bursts away, And sees defenceless realms receive his sway; Short sway! fair Austria spreads her mournful charms, The queen, the beauty, sets the world in arms...
Seite 290 - Silesia was reunited to the dominions of Prussia. Two years of war sufficed for the conquest of this important province. The treasure which the late king had left was nearly exhausted ; but it is a cheap purchase, when whole provinces are bought for seven or eight millions of crowns. The union of circumstances at the moment peculiarly favoured this enterprise. It was necessary for it that France should allow itself to be drawn into the war ; that Russia should be attacked by Sweden; that, from timidity,...
Seite 71 - ... account to the queen, that I might not alarm her. As I was entering the room of the king in the morning, he instantly seized me by the hair and threw me on the ground, and after having tried the vigour of his arms upon my poor body, he dragged me, in spite of my resistance, to a window, and was going to perform the office of the mutes of the seraglio ; for, seizing the cord with which the curtain is fastened, he drew it round my neck. Fortunately I had had time to get up from the ground ; I laid...
Seite 290 - Temps. of Prussia, should become, in spite of himself, the instrument of its aggrandizement. What, however, contributed the most to this conquest was, an army which had been formed for twenty-two years by means of a discipline admirable in itself, and superior to that of the troops of the rest of Europe ; generals who were also true patriots ; wise and incorruptible ministers ; and, finally, a certain good fortune, which often accompanies youth, and deserts a more advanced age...
Seite 36 - The king of England was a prince who valued himself on his sentiments ; but, unfortunately, he had never applied to the enlightening of his mind. Many virtues, carried to an extreme, become vices. This was his case. He affected a firmness which degenerated into harshness, and a tranquillity which might be called indolence. His generosity extended only to his favourites and mistresses, by whom he suffered himself to be governed ; the rest of mankind were excluded.
Seite 429 - In spite of his love of sarcasm and pleasantry, he was never known to indulge in them, at the expense of one of these poor people. The natural consequence of this considerateness and attention of the king towards the lower orders, was, an unbounded attachment on their part towards him ; whom they regarded, with truth, as their father and their friend. During one of Frederic's journeys through Silesia, the wife of a peasant, near Breslau, had presented to him a basket of fruit ; and had been so touched...
Seite 282 - His foes' derision, and his subjects' blame, And steals to death from anguish and from shame. ' Enlarge* my life with multitude of days ;' In health, in sickness, thus...
Seite 312 - continued in as bad a state after the death of the Cardinal de Fleury as during the last two years of his administration. The house of Austria rose again from its ashes. France was cruelly pressed upon by that power, and by England.

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