The Englishman in Paris, Band 1

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Seite 179 - Pretty ! in amber to observe the forms Of hairs, or straws, or dirt, or grubs, or worms ! The things, we know, are neither rich nor rare, But wonder how the devil they got there.
Seite 222 - ... chiefly favourable to the discharge of functions from which a true respect for her sex, cherished by the men, would entirely preserve her, and the enjoyment of gratifications which a proper selfrespect on her own part would prohibit her from partaking. ' The chief emblem and representation of this condition of married women is the Boudoir. It is a temple of separation and luxury. It belongs to the wife exclusively ; the husband has neither property in it, nor power over it. If she were suspected...
Seite 214 - ... confidence in the sense of integrity and honour in the young female mind. Mothers will not, indeed, instruct their daughters to intrigue after they are married ; and they will not, probably, talk of their own licentious indulgences before their daughters ; but their conversation with their intimates, in the hearing of their children, is sufficiently instructive, that connubial constancy is in little estimation, and less practice.
Seite 105 - As ropes are likely to break, he is not surprised or dismayed, if called upon to mend those by which his horses are tied rather than harnessed ; and this he does with packthread, if he happen to have any in his pocket, and with his garters if he have not.
Seite 221 - ... disagreeable ; — but she never thinks of resenting the application as offensive. — In short, a husband here cannot rationally calculate on his wife's fidelity, and I believe, very seldom does. If the parties, after marriage, feel themselves very much attached to each other, their reciprocal fidelity is secured by a mutual pledge on honour, which is added to the compact made at the altar, as an extra obligation, not necessarily included in the original engagement. In Paris, it is the regular...
Seite 223 - ... not be violated. What I mean is, that such is the rule of good manners in France, and the man who disregards it is esteemed a brute, — an object of the general dislike and disgust of both sexes. The Boudoir is the apartment, as I have before observed, that is most commonly complete in its elegance. The nursery for the children, in the houses of families of rank, contrary to the custom in England, is neglected, and crammed into some inconvenient corner ; but the Boudoir for the mother is rich...
Seite 215 - ... misery, to the insolence and coarseness of the other. The dangerous seduction is in Paris, — where the harlot sits beside the girl of virtue, pretty, demure, attentive to the play, and coquetting with the surrounding beaux. The young lady is sensible that this woman does little more than her mamma does, and she sees no difference in their carriage. The men behave alike respectfully to both ; they are both, then, entirely on an equality to the eye, and pretty nearly so to the understanding....
Seite 105 - You scarcely ever look at him but you find him repairing an accident—knotting his whip, or mending his saddle, or joining a bridle, or knocking some part of the machinery with a stone picked up from the road. The progress of the travellers does not stop while these repairs are making; no embarrassment is discoverable ; neither disconcertion nor anger takes...
Seite 221 - ... an insult, in Paris, if a man, sitting down by a married lady, immediately commences making love to her. His language is divested of all unnecessary explicitness ; but it has a sufficiently palpable tendency to the last favour that a woman can grant. It is, in fact, a mere matter of course almost, to address a French married lady in those terms of gallantry, which, in England, are employed to females whese persons are still disposable.
Seite 221 - England, are employed to females whese persons are still disposable. The woman to whom they are directed may not be inclined to listen to them, • — she may be engaged at the moment, or the application may be disagreeable ; — but she never thinks of resenting the application as offensive. — In short, a husband here cannot rationally calculate on his wife's fidelity, and I believe, very seldom does. If the parties, after marriage, feel themselves very much attached to each other, their reciprocal...

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