The Life of William Wilberforce, Band 5

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John Murray, 1838
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Seite 363 - Though ye have lien among the pots, yet shall ye be as the wings of a dove covered with silver, and her feathers with yellow gold.
Seite 65 - Commit thy way unto the Lord, and put thy trust in him : and he shall bring it to pass. 6 He shall make thy righteousness as clear as the light: and thy just dealing as the noon-day.
Seite 309 - Surely goodness and mercy have followed me all the days of my life, and I shall dwell in the house of the Lord for ever.
Seite 341 - Romilly was, that though he had such an immense quantity of business, he always seemed an idle man. If you had not known who and what he was, you would have said, 'he is a remarkably gentlemanlike pleasant man : I suppose, poor fellow, he has no business;' for he would stand at the bar of the house and chat with you, and talk over the last novel, with which he was as well acquainted as if he had nothing else to think about.
Seite 134 - Poor fellow ! He was certainly deranged— the effect, probably, of continued wear of mind. The strong impression on my mind is, that it is the effect of the non-observance of the sabbath, both as to abstracting from politics, and from the constant recurring of the same reflections, and as correcting the false views of worldly things, and bringing them down to their true diminutiveness.
Seite 373 - We, the undersigned Members of both Houses of Parliament, being anxious, upon public grounds, to show our respect for the memory of the late William Wilberforce, and being also satisfied that public honours can never be more fitly bestowed than upon such benefactors of mankind, earnestly request that he may be buried in Westminster Abbey, and that we, and others who may agree with us in these sentiments, may have permission to attend his funeral.
Seite 72 - In consequence of a very civil message from the Duchess of Kent, I waited on her this morning. She received me with her fine animated child on the floor by her side, with its playthings, of which I soon became one. She was very civil; but, as she did not sit down, I did not think it right to stay above a quarter of an hour...
Seite 341 - I am worn to death; here have we been sitting on in the vacation, from nine in the morning until four; and when we leave this place, I have to read through all my papers, to be ready for to-morrow morning; but the most extraordinary part of all is...
Seite 341 - One of the most remarkable things about Romilly was, that, though he had such an immense quantity of business, he always seemed an idle man. If you had not known who and what he was, you would have said, 'He is a remarkably gentlemanlike pleasant man; I suppose, poor fellow! he has no business...
Seite 215 - Sir John Scott used to be a great deal at my house. I saw much of him then, and it is no more than his due to say, that, when he was solicitor and attorney-general under Pitt, he never fawned and flattered as some did, but always assumed the tone and station of a man who was conscious that he must show he respects himself, if he wishes to be respected by others.

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