The Landscape Gardener: Comprising the History and Principles of Tasteful Horitculture

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J. Ridgway and sons, 1835 - 106 Seiten
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Seite 44 - The glory of Lebanon shall come unto thee, the fir-tree, the pine-tree, and the box together, to beautify the place of my sanctuary; and I will make the place of my feet glorious.
Seite 56 - ... white colour. A single ray is by him divided into seven, which all fall upon a piece of linen, or a sheet of white paper, in their order, one above the other, and at unequal distances. The first is red, the second orange, the third yellow, the fourth green, the fifth blue, the sixth indigo, the seventh a violet-purple.
Seite 57 - ... conclusion, but that in the order of prismatic colours, adjacent colours are inharmonious ; and that harmony results only from union of two colours, distant in order by one intermediate tint. The principle productive of harmony being thus discovered, may receive confirmation, by experiment with ribbands of different colours, blended, or with sewing silks twisted, in the preceding order of arrangement. Yet, beauty resulting not only from harmony, but also from contrast, the next inquiry is, from...
Seite 59 - On account of its glaring whiteness, supplying neither contrast nor harmony, white entering into the composition of every shade of tint, and particularly being productive of semi-colours ; consequently, being a component principle, when uncombined it can neither harmonise, nor contrast with itself. Why does the olive tint of the expanding oakleaf offend the eye of taste ? Because, its being composed of green in combination with yellow, the component principle can neither harmonise nor contrast with...
Seite 46 - But, for accomplishment of such an important desideratum, science must be suffered to acquire unlimited confidence, in exercise of control; while prejudice must cease to plead for senseless ' custom, more honoured in the breach than in the observance.' An individual proprietor, or a public association, might rest assured of the anticipation of a result decidedly warranting the experiment. •' In resumption of the topic of evergreen trees, for formation of a foreground, it may strongly be recommended,...
Seite 46 - In short, the recommendation cannot be too frequently reiterated, to substitute studied assortment of tints for tasteless, indiscriminate admixture. Let but the pictorial artist be permitted, or the amateur condescend, to transfer his principles of taste, the one from his easel, the other from his gallery, to occasional superintendence of English...
Seite 48 - ... shape and tint of leaf, from delicate blossom, and glowing berry. If suffered to remain unpruned, by gaining height, it becomes hollow and leafless beneath, retaining, like other evergreens, only two years' leaves, except about midsummer, when the third year's are annexed, some weeks previous to the decay of the first. If not surrounded by evergreens more stunted in growth, for concealment of its lower leafless branches, it should biennially be deprived of a few long shoots, by application of...
Seite 59 - ... can neither harmonise, nor contrast with itself. Why does the olive tint of the expanding oakleaf offend the eye of taste ? Because, its being composed of green in combination with yellow, the component principle can neither harmonise nor contrast with itself, in a simple uncompounded tint, in the surrounding grass, or foliage of more forward trees. Why does the verdant herbage of spring produce inferior pictoresque effect, in grounds ornamented with trees, than the sterile grass of early autumn,...
Seite 48 - the icy fang and churlish chiding of the winter's wind," the gay, cheering, precocious laurestinus anticipates the lingering arrival of an English spring. Tenacious of florage and permanently retentive of foliated decoration, it is entitled to numerical predominance over every blossoming shrub. By seasonable intervention and flowering profusion, it compensates for temporary diminution of ornament, in other component ingredients of a shrubbery, thus transferring to nipping winter's gloom the exhilarating...
Seite 48 - ... foliated decoration, it is entitled to numerical predominance over every blossoming shrub. By seasonable intervention and flowering profusion it compensates for temporary diminution of ornament, in other component ingredients of a shrubbery, thus transferring to nipping winter's gloom the exhilarating semblance of summer's embellishment. Productive of such interesting impression in pleasing the eye, it certainly merits conspicuousness by prominent position. • The Arbutus is a shrub peculiarly...

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