Sailing directions for the English Channel and coast of France; with an accurate description of the coasts of England, south of Ireland, and Channel islands, by J. and A. Walker

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Seite 132 - NbW; but when the wind happens to be foul for Crookhaven, it will prove fair for Long Island Sound. You may anchor, with westerly and northerly winds, one...
Seite 32 - The harbour of Newhaven is formed in the channel of the river Ouse, at its entrance into the sea, by wooden piers carried out in a southerly direction across the beach. The river is navigable as far as the town of Lewes, and open to the flow and ebb of the tide for four miles further up the stream, or twelve miles altogether, and affords a powerful backwater for scouring the entrance.
Seite 14 - We did not, therefore, consider it necessary to visit this part of the coast, where no harbours at present exist. 1. MARGATE. Margate was the first place at which we landed after leaving the river. The harbour is situated in a small bay between two extensive flats of chalk rocks, the Nayland on the west, and the Fulsam on the east, both of which are covered before high water. The artificial harbour is formed by a stone pier, which commences on the eastern side of the bay (around which the town is...
Seite 20 - The grand intention of this light being to keep vessels to the eastward of the Goodwin, those coming from the North Sea towards the Strait of Dover must not bring it to bear more southerly than SSW, but should always keep the light rather to the westward than...
Seite 124 - Isle,) appears four times its own breadth open to the northward of the lowest part of the declining land under fort Camden, thence steer for the middle of Spike Island, keeping as nearly midway as possible between Forts Carlisle and Camden, until two remarkable...
Seite 54 - Head, the shore is principally cliff, and composed for the most part of chalk, its elevation and chalky appearance continuing as far as Old Harry, where it again abruptly declines. Throughout Christchurch Bay the land is generally low, and still more so in the vicinity of Hurst Castle, the base of which is very little elevated above the level of the sea. From thence the western end of the Isle of Wight, the Needle Point, rises perpendicularly, and being composed wholly of chalk becomes very remarkable,...
Seite 23 - Harbour (if the vessel does not draw too much water), is two hours before high water, or when the tide begins to set to the NE outside of the Pier Heads. A boat and men are appointed by the Harbour Trust, to attend ships coming into the harbour, without expense ; they in general make a rope fast to bring you up, and then leave you, if there are many ships coming in : but if not. they will assist you further. DIRECTIONS for SAILING towards the Harbour in the NIGHT, which is only to be attempted by...
Seite 166 - Amfroque rocks, the stream takes the direction of that in the offing, viz., the first two hours of the flood sets directly for the north end of Herm island, gradually joining the south-western stream in the Russel, and the last hour of the flood as well as the first of the ebb.
Seite 132 - Gabriel will appear on with Leamcon signal-tower and castle to the north-eastward, and the Brow Head (on which there is also a signal-tower) will appear to close in with the Alderman Head to the westward. The harbour will now begin to unfold itself. The Revenue officers' houses, on the northern shore, will be first seen, and, ultimately, Coghlan's white look-out tower on the southern side.
Seite 33 - ... inwards by a stone embankment nearly three-quarters of a mile in a straight line; and the bar, which formerly extended from the western side nearly across the mouth of the harbour, has been considerably reduced since the completion of this work, the extension of the eastern pier, and other improvements which have of late been made in straightening and deepening the river above the town. During the flood-tide and fine weather the harbour is easy of access, from the indraught and eddy-tide which...

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