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‘Wash' ('WASSH'), BLACKSMITH'S TOOL." COLONEL OWEN ROWE.—What is known -Dr. Bradley has been supplied with a concerning the arms and descendants of this reference to a membrane of the King's regicide? I believe there has been some Remembrancer's Memoranda Roll of 1363, correspondence on the subject in ‘N. & Q.,' for this word. Careful examination of that but lack references. A précis of the inmembrane does not show the word. It may formation elicited would be welcomed. be that the reference was miscopied.

TRIUMVIR. I shall be glad if one of your correspon- [We reproduce a query which appeared in dents can supply any early reference to the 1 $. ix. 449:word—with a quotation. There are, no doubt,

“ OWEN ROWE THE REGICIDE. several printed inventories that record the tools

• Mark Noble, in his Lives of the Regicides, says of a smith's forge ; but I do not know where that Owen Rowe was descended from Sir Thomas to find these. ROBT. J. WHITWELL. Rowe, Lord Mayor of London in 1568. In the

Additional Manuscripts (British Museum), 6337, CRIPPLEGATE: DRAWINGS WANTED.-In p. 52, is a coat in trick : Argent, on a chevron connexion with a history of the ward of azure, three bezants between three trefoils per Cripplegate in the City of London, which pale gules and

vert, a martlet sable for difference ;

crest, a roe's head couped gules, attired or, I am about completing, I should be glad to rising from a wreath ; and beneath is written, hear of any original unpublished drawings - Coil. Row, Coll. of hors and futt.”. These arms of buildings, &c., of the eighteenth and I imagine to have been the regicide's. If so, he nineteenth centuries. I have all those con

was a fourth son. Query, whose ? The Hackney tained in the British Museum and the Captain Henry Rowe was buried from Mr. Simon

Parish Register records, that on Nov. 6, 1655, Guildhall Library. JOHN J. BADDELEY.

Corbet's, of Mare Street, Hackney. How was he 32 Woodbury Down, N.

related to Colonel Owen Rowe? I should feel CHARLES HOLLINGBERY was admitted to could furnish me with his descent from Sir Thos.

particularly obliged to any correspondent who Westminster School in September 1826, Rowe. aged 13. I should be glad to obtain any vol. iv. p. 640) the daughter of Mr. Rowland

According to Mr. Lysons (Environs of London, information about him. G. F. R. B.

Wilson, and widow of Dr. Crisp, married Colonel “ AUSTER "LAND TENURE.

Rowe; adding in a note, that he supposes this

In a deed dated Colonel Rowe to have been Colonel Owen Rowe, 1800, a house in this parish is described as the regicide. The same statement is found in “all that Messuage and Tenement of Old Hasted's History of Kent (edit. 1778), vol. .., Auster in the Manor of Yatton.” Can any p. 181. . I should be glad of some more certain one explain the meaning of the term “Old information on this point ; also, what issue Owen Auster which I understand has something marriages are recorded in the Hackney Register.

Rowe left, if any, besides two daughters, whose to do with a system of land tenure. Was “I am likewise anxious to learn whether there it confined to Somerset ? In a neighbouring exist any lineal descendants of this family of parish there is land formerly known as the Rowe, which had its origin in Kent; and thence Auster tenements. H. C. BARNARD.

branching off in the sixteenth century, settled Yatton, Somerset.

and obtained large possessions in Shacklewell,

Walthamstow, Low Layton, Higham Hill, and LAMB IN RUSSELL STREET.—Charles Lamb nobility are descended from them.

Muswell Hill. Through females, several of our

TEE BEE." and his sister for a time occupied lodgings

At 10 s. i. 356, in reply to a short general in Russell Street, Covent Garden, where query, reference is given toWill's Coffee-house formerly had stood.

“The indictment, arraignment, tryal, and This street is by no means the same as judgment at large of twenty-nine regicides, the Great Russell Street, Bloomsbury.

murtherers of.... King Charles I..... begun Was Russell Street, Covent Garden ever at Hicks's-hall, 9th Oct., 1660, and continued at correctly known as: Great Russell Street ? Which will be found in the Corporation Library,

the Old Baily." London, 1739, The 'D.N.B.' and Ainger's 'Charles Lamb

Guildhall.) in the ‘English Men of Letters 'series both call the street Great Russell Street, Covent

MAJOR-GENERAL

Hon. WILLIAM Garden, while the latter book uses both HERBERT, son of Thomas, 8th Earl of

and magazine and newspaper Pembroke, and father of Henry, 1st Earl of writers frequently repeat the error.

Carnarvon is stated by 'G. E. C.' to have It seems desirable that an important married Catherine Elizabeth Towes, of Aixbook of reference like the 'D.N.B.' should la-Chapelle. be correct on such a simple point.

Is it possible to trace the parentage of Cambridge, Mass. E. BASIL LUPTON. this lady ?

P. D. M.

THE

names ;

me

COWPER : PRONUNCIATION OF NAME.— THE HONOURABLE MR.—In accordance I have been told that the poet Cowper said with a suggestion made in the Montagusomewhere or other that he pronounced his Chelmsford Joint Report on Indian reforms, name so that the first syllable rhymed with the use of the courtesy designation “The “loop.” Could any of your readers give Honourable Mr.” has been curtailed.

& reference or supply me with any Members of the Provincial Councils will no evidence that may serve to determine the longer enjoy that distinction, for an offici: 1 question ?

T. NICKLIS. announcement states that [Tbis subject has been discussed in ‘N. & Q.' “ The Governor-General is pleased to permit See, for example, 10 S. xii. 265, 335, 372, 432, 518. | the title 'Honourable’ to be borne during their At the first reference MR. THOMAS BAYNE gives term of office by the following officers in India : the solution of Cowper's riddle on the Kiss (Gent. (1) Members of the Governor-General's ExeMag.,' vol. lxxvi.), which, not itself by Cowper, cutive Council, (2) President of the Council of was taken to be his and to decide the pronuncia- State, (3) President of the Legislative Assembly, tion. It runs :

(4) Chief Justice and Puisne Judges of the High A riddle by Cowper

Courts, (5) Members of Executive Councils and Made me swear like a trooper ;

Ministers in Governors' Provinces, (6) Residents But my anger, alas ! was in vain ;

of the 1st Class, (7) Presidents of Legislative For, remembering the bliss

Councils in Governors' Provinces, (8) the Chief Of beauty's soft kiss,

Judge and Judges of the Chief Court of Lower I now long for such riddles again.

Burma and (9) Members of the Council of State.”
Hence arises my query.

When did the In 5 S. i. a similar correspondence will be found, and at p. 274 occurs the following :

“Mr.” append itself to the title ? I think COWPER : TROOPER (5 S. i. 68, 135).

My

I am correct in saying that when the title wife saw some years ago a letter from the poet was first used in India there was no question Cowper to the late Mrs. Charlotte Smith, the of “Mr.” When he arrived at the requisite poetess, in which he stated the pronunciation of attitude John Jones became The Hon. his name was Cooper.” That letter was in the John Jones : nowadays he would be called possession of a lady in Leamington, who was niece to Mrs. Smith.

JOSEPH FISHER. The Hon. Mr. Jones. Why ? The official Waterford.]

regulation quoted above says the title is

Honourable," and omits both “the” and ST. ANDREW's, SCOTLAND : PRE-REFORMA

“Mr. TION SEAL.--I shall feel obliged if any

Ought we to speak of “Honourable reader Jones

Honourable John Jones ?” can tell me (1) whether the Seal of the Bishop of St. Andrew's for the Archdiocese Provincial Governors in India first acquired

May I also be permitted to inquire when of St. Andrews, Scotland, was lost at the the title “His Excellency ? There is an Reformation ; or (2) whether it is still in odd sequel, for the wife of a Governor is existence ; ór (3) whether it was used designated—by usage if not by official during the early years of the Reformation, sanction from the Government of India and when ?

“Her Excellency." Yet I never heard of HISTORICAL STUDENT.

the wife of a Lieutenant-Governor, who is "THE ASHES.”—May I appeal to the by right" His Honour,” being called “Her

Honour.”!

S. T. S. omniscience of ‘N. & Q.' to tell me the exact derivation of the expression 'The CARDINAL DE ROHAN CHABOT.-I should Ashes,” used to mean the supremacy of be grateful if any reader could give me Australia (comes first this time) or England further information with regards to the life in the Test International Cricket Matches. and

of Cardinal Francis Louis I have asked several people who are all Augustus de Rohan Chabot, Archbishop of rgreed that it means the championship - Besauçon who died in 1833, and as to whether but why “The Ashes ” ?

there are any portraits extant of him. ANXIOUS ENQUIRER.

M. B. MCA. [The Intelligence Department of The Times informs us that the origin of the catch-phrase

Wat TYLER.—Mr. C. E. Clark at p. 189 obout bringing back the ashes” is to be found of his ‘Mistakes We Make' says that Wat in The Sporting Life of 1882. In this year Tyler was killed England was defeated at Kennington Oval by certainly not as an insurgent, but as one who the Australians land the paper referred to pub- had incurred the vengeance of the Mayor by setting lisbed an 'In Memoriam,' the exact wording of fire to all the Southwark houses of ill-fame which which cannot be remembered, to " English | Walworth held as a very profitable monopoly.” cricket, which died at the Oval on Aug. 29, 1882. The body will be cremated, and the ashes' taken Can this statement be substantiated ? to Australia."]

ALFRED S. E. ACKERMAN.

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“ But you

came !"

OLD SONG WANTED.

4. Complete copies of all the local Direc*Framley Parsonage chap. xi. – tories, and before then, of the local Subsidy

* Ludovic,” said Lady Lupton, “ won't you Rolls, Land Tax Assessments, Hearth Tax give us another song?"...." I have sung all Assessments, Muster Rolls, Recusant Rolls that I knew, mother. There's Culpepper.. He has got to give us his dream-how be dreamt of 1841 and 1851.

and complete copies of the Census Returns that he dwelt in marble halls !'" I sang that an hour ago," said the captain ..

5. Then abstracts of all the wills of people certainly have not told us how' your little lovers connected with the place, of the pleadings

and depositions in lawsuits, and of every The dream about the “marble halls is loose deed or document which exists amongst pretty well known; but from what song the millions in the Public Record Office, the comes the allusion to the “little lovers ? Probate and Diocesan Registries and in

J. C. private hands. These to be arranged simply ROGER MOMPESSON.-Can any reader of

in order of date and type-written. ‘N. & Q.’ give me the name of the consti- hand for ready reference, PUBLIC LIBRARIAN

I think that, this working material at tuency represented in Parliament by Roger might begin to be in a position to answer Mompesson, cf Lincoln's Inn, about 1700 ?

E. A. J.

genealogical enquiries. It might cost a few

thousand pounds for any single parish to THE PACKERSHIP OF LONDON.-In June acquire such a collection, and take a few 1552 Sir John Thynne resigned his patent years to get together, and he himself would of the “Packership of London.” What be all the better equipped with some years' office would this represent ? Perhaps a experience of record searching outside his reader of ‘N. & Q.' can say if it is still in own library ; but until both possess these existence ?

R. B. qualifications he cannot expect inquirers to

contribute fcr special searches much towards

the library funds, for they will assuredly be Replies.

disappointed at the result.

GEORGE SHERWOOD.

210 Strand, W.C.2. REPRESENTATIVE COUNTY

There is a fine collection of Norfolk LIBRARIES, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE.

items at the Norwich Public Library (Mr. (12 S. viii. 8, 34, 54, 76.)

Stephens). And the Lowestoft Public Lib. THE average Public Library and Public rary (Miss K. Durrant) contains a good Librarian are not at all equipped to answer selection of bocks on the twin counties of genealogical problems.

Norfolk and Suffolk, together with the May I make a few suggestions as to what interesting MSS. of Mr. William Blytha library should acquire before beginning Gerish, of Southtown, Great Yarmouth, to qualify to fulfil such a function. It relating to Norfclk Archæology and Folkmight then be found that to invest a locality lore.

W. J. CHAMBERS. with direct personal interests, via the study

Clancarty, Regent Road, Lowestoft. of genealɔgy, is the surest road to the County of Suffolk. The Ipswich Public attainment of whatever aims Public Libraries Library contains a large collection of local are generally supposed to possess.

books relating to Ipswich and the county 1. Of course, copies of all the histories of generally. I believe the Suffolk Institute the county in which the library is situate, of Archæology at Bury St. Edmunds posof the County Visitation Pedigrees and of sesses a collection of books and MSS. The all local histories.

Public Library at Lowestoft also owns a gcod 2. Copies of the Parish Registers from collection of local bocks, while as to those in beginning to end, of all the Manorial Ccurt private hands, Mr. Milner-Gibson-Cullum, Rolls and of all the Monumental Inscriptions D.L., Hardwick House, Bury St. Edmunds in all the churhes, churchyards and ceme- has a fine collection, and the library of Mr. teries in the parish or town that the library F. A. Crisp at the Grove Park Press is a represents.

considerable one and rich in MSS., but now 3. Every original document, parchment, being dispersed. The collection of Mr. deed, &c., upon which it can lay hands, H. B. W. Wayman at Bloomsbury is rich properly calendared and indexed, so that in rare broadsides, Commonwealth quartos the list of its contents can be seen at a glance. I and MSS. J. HARVEY BLOOM, M.A.

me

CowPER : PRONUNCIATION OF NAME.— THE HONOURABLE MR.-In accordance I have been told that the poet Cowper said with a suggestion made in the Montagusomewhere cr other that he pronounced his Chelmsford Joint Report on Indian reforms, name so that the first syllable rhymed with the use of the courtesy designation “The “loop.” Could any of your readers give Honourable Mr. has been curtailed.

å reference or supply me with any Members of the Provincial Councils will no evidence that may serve to determine the longer enjoy that distinction, for an offici: 1 question ?

T. NICKLIS. announcement states that [This subject has been discussed in ‘N. & Q.' “The Governor-General is pleased to permit See, for example, 10 S. xii. 265, 335, 372, 432, 516. | the title 'Honourable' to be borne during their At the first reference MR. THOMAS BAYNE gives term of office by the following officers in India : the solution of Cowper's riddle on the Kiss (Gent. (1). Members of the Governor-General's ExeMag.,' vol. lxxvi.), which, not itself by Cowper, cutive Council; (2) President of the Council of was taken to be his and to decide the pronuncia- State, (3) President of the Legislative Assembly, tion. It runs :

(4) Chief Justice and Puisne Judges of the High A riddle by Cowper

Courts, (5) Members of Executive Councils and Made me swear like a trooper ;

Ministers in Governors' Provinces, (6) Residents

of the 1st Class, (7) Presidents of Legislative But my anger, alas ! was in vain ; For, remembering the bliss

Councils in Governors' Provinces, (8) the Chief Of beauty's soft kiss,

Judge and Judges of the Chief Court of Lower I now long for such riddles again.

Burma and (9) Members of the Council of State.”
Hence arises my query.

When did the In 5 s. i. a similar correspondence will be found, and at p. 274 occurs the following :

“Mr.” append itself to the title ? I think CowPER : TROOPER (5 S. i. 68, 135).

- My

I am correct in saying that when the title wife saw some years ago a letter from the poet was first used in India there was no question Cowper to the late Mrs. Charlotte Smith, the of “Mr.” When he arrived at the requisite poetess, in which he stated the pronunciation of attitude John Jones became The Hon. his name was Cooper;” That letter was in the John Jones : nowadays he would be called possession of a lady in Leamington, who was niece to Mrs. Smith.

JOSEPH FISHER. The Hon. Mr. Jones. Why? The official Waterford.]

regulation quoted above says the title is

Honourable,” and omits both “the” and St. ANDREW's, SCOTLAND: PRE-REFORMA

‘Mr.” Ought we to speak of “Honourable TION SEAL.—I shall feel obliged if reader

Jones

Honourable John Jones ? can tell me (1) whether the Seal of the

May I also be permitted to inquire when Bishop of St. Andrew's for the Archdiocese Provincial Governors in India first acquired of St. Andrews, Scotland, was lost at the the title “His Excellency”? There is an Reformation ; or (2) whether it is still in odd sequel, for the wife of a Governor is existence ; or (3) whether it was used designated-by usage if not by official during the early years of the Reformation, sanction from the Government of India and when ?

“Her Excellency." Yet I never heard of HISTORICAL STUDENT.

the wife of a Lieutenant-Governor, who is “THE ASHES.”—May I appeal to the by right,". His Honour,” being called “Her

Honour.”!

S. T. s. omniscience of ‘N. & Q.' to tell me the exact derivation of the expression “The CARDINAL DE ROHAN CHABOT.-I should Ashes,” used to mean the supremacy of be grateful if any reader could give me Australia (comes first this time) or England further information with regards to the life in the Test International Cricket Matches. and

of Cardinal Francis Louis I have asked several people who are all Augustus de Rohan Chabot, Archbishop of igreed that it means the championship Besauçon who died in 1833, and as to whether but why “The Ashes ” ?

there are any portraits extant of him. ANXIOUS ENQUIRER.

M. B. MCA. (The Intelligence Department of The Times informs us that the origin of the catch-phrase

WAT TYLER.—Mr. C. E. Clark at p. 189 obout“ bringing back the ashes " is to be found of his ‘Mistakes We Make' says that Wat in The Sporting Life of 1882. In this year Tyler was killed England was defeated at Kennington Oval by certainly not as an insurgent, but as one who the Australians land the paper referred to pub. had incurred the vengeance of the Mayor by setting lished an 'In Memoriam,' the exact wording of fire to all the Southwark houses of ill-famo which which cannot be remembered, to “ English cricket, which died at the Oval on Aug. 29, 1882.

Walworth held as a very profitable monopoly." The body will be cremated, and the ashes taken | Can this statement be substantiated ? to Australia."]

ALFRED S. E. ACKERMAN,

any

or

career

" won't you

OLD SONG WANTED.

4. Complete copies of all the local DirecFramley Parsonage'chap. xi. :

tories, and before then, of the local Subsidy Ludovic,” said Lady Lupton,

Rolls, Land Tax Assessments, Hearth Tax give us another song ? ...." I have sung all Assessments, Muster Rolls, Recusant Rolls that I knew, mother. There's Culpepper.... He has got to give us his dream--how be ' dreamt of 1841 and 1851.

and complete copies of the Census Returns that he dwelt in marble halls !'" “I sang that an hour ago," said the captain... But

5. Then abstracts of all the wills of people

you certainly have not told us how ' your little lovers connected with the place, of the pleadings came !""

and depositions in lawsuits, and of every The dream about the “marble halls ” is loose deed or document which exists amongst pretty well known; but from what song the millions in the Public Record Office, the comes the allusion to the “little lovers ” ? Probate and Diocesan Registries and in

J. C. private hands. These to be arranged simply ROGER MOMPESSON.-Can any reader of

in order of date and type-written. 'N. & Q.’ give me the name of the consti- hand for ready reference, Public LIBRARIAN

I think that, this working material at tuency represented in Parliament by Roger might begin to be in a position to answer Mompesson, cf Lincoln's Inn, about 1700 ?

E. A. J.

genealogical enquiries. It might cost a few

thousand pounds for any single parish to THE PACKERSHIP OF LONDON.-In June acquire such a collection, and take a few 1552 Sir John Thynne resigned his patent years to get together, and he himself would of the “Packership of London. What be all the better equipped with some years' office would this represent ? Perhaps a experience of record searching outside his reader of ‘N. & Q.’ can say if it is still in own library ; but until both possess these existence ?

R. B. qualifications he cannot expect inquirers to

contribute for special searches much towards

the library funds, for they will assuredly be Replies.

disappointed at the result.

GEORGE SHERWOOD. REPRESENTATIVE COUNTY

210 Strand, W.C.2. LIBRARIES, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE.

There is fine collection of Norfolk

items at the Norwich Public Library (Mr. (12 S. viii. 8, 34, 54, 76.)

Stephens). And the Lowestoft Public Lib. The average Public Library and Public rary (Miss K. Durrant) contains a good Librarian are not at all equipped to answer selection of bocks on the twin counties of genealogical problems.

Norfolk and Suffolk, together with the May I make a few suggestions as to what interesting MSS. of Mr. William Blytha library should acquire before beginning Gerish, of Southtown, Great Yarmouth, to qualify to fulfil such a function ? It relating to Norfolk Archæology and Folkmight then be found that to invest a locality

lore.

W. J. CHAMBERS. with direct personal interests, via the study

Clancarty, Regent Road, Lowestoft. of genealɔgy, is the surest road to the County of Suffolk. The Ipswich Public attainment of whatever aims Public Libraries Library contains a large collection of local are generally supposed to possess.

books relating to Ipswich and the county 1. Of course, copies of all the histories of generally. I believe the Suffolk Institute the county in which the library is situate, of Archæology at Bury St. Edmunds posof the County Visitation Pedigrees and of sesses a collection of books and MSS. The all local histories.

Public Library at Lowestoft also owns a good 2. Copies of the Parish Registers from collection of local books, while as to those in beginning to end, of all the Manorial Court private hands, Mr. Milner-Gibson-Cullum, Rolls and of all the Monumental Inscriptions D.L., Hardwick House, Bury St. Edmunds in all the churhes, churchyards and ceme- has a fine collection, and the library of Mr. teries in the parish or town that the library F. A. Crisp at the Grove Park Press is a represents.

considerable one and rich in MSS., but now 3. Every original document, parchment, being dispersed. The collection of Mr. deed, &c., upon which it can lay hands, H. B. W. Wayman at Bloomsbury is rich properly calendared and indexed, so that in rare broadsides, Commonwealth quartos the list of its contents can be seen at a glance. I and MSS. J. HARVEY BLOOM, M.A.

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