Religions of Japan in Practice

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Princeton University Press, 28.03.1999 - 564 Seiten

This anthology reflects a range of Japanese religions in their complex, sometimes conflicting, diversity. In the tradition of the Princeton Readings in Religions series, the collection presents documents (legends and miracle tales, hagiographies, ritual prayers and ceremonies, sermons, reform treatises, doctrinal tracts, historical and ethnographic writings), most of which have been translated for the first time here, that serve to illuminate the mosaic of Japanese religions in practice.


George Tanabe provides a lucid introduction to the "patterned confusion" of Japan's religious practices. He has ordered the anthology's forty-five readings under the categories of "Ethical Practices," "Ritual Practices," and "Institutional Practices," moving beyond the traditional classifications of chronology, religious traditions (Shinto, Confucianism, Buddhism, etc.), and sects, and illuminating the actual orientation of people who engage in religious practices. Within the anthology's three broad categories, subdivisions address the topics of social values, clerical and lay precepts, gods, spirits, rituals of realization, faith, court and emperor, sectarian founders, wizards, and heroes, orthopraxis and orthodoxy, and special places. Dating from the eighth through the twentieth centuries, the documents are revealed to be open to various and evolving interpretations, their meanings dependent not only on how they are placed in context but also on how individual researchers read them. Each text is preceded by an introductory explanation of the text's essence, written by its translator. Instructors and students will find these explications useful starting points for their encounters with the varied worlds of practice within which the texts interact with readers and changing contexts.



Religions of Japan in Practice is a compendium of relationships between great minds and ordinary people, abstruse theories and mundane acts, natural and supernatural powers, altruism and self-interest, disappointment and hope, quiescence and war. It is an indispensable sourcebook for scholars, students, and general readers seeking engagement with the fertile "ordered disorder" of religious practice in Japan.

 

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Religions of Japan in practice

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The fifth in a distinguished series of anthologies on world religion from Princeton, this volume brings together a variety of documents representing the diverse and complex religious traditions of ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Religions of Japan in practice

Nutzerbericht  - Not Available - Book Verdict

The fifth in a distinguished series of anthologies on world religion from Princeton, this volume brings together a variety of documents representing the diverse and complex religious traditions of ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

Introduction George J Tanabe
3
A Modern Norito
12
Selected Anecdotes to Illustrate Ten Maxims Ward Geddes
25
Confucianism
26
Kaibara Ekkens Precepts on the Family Mary Evelyn Tucker
38
The Shingaku of Nakazawa Döni Janine Anderson Sawada
53
Buddhism
59
Eisais Promotion of Zen for the Protection of the Country Albert
63
A Japanese Shugendô Apocryphal Text Paul Swanson
246
The Condition of the Nembutsu
257
Plain Words on the Pure Land Way Dennis Hirota
268
Shinrans Faith as Immediate Fulfillment in Pure Land Buddhism
280
The Confucian Monarchy of Nara Japan Charles Holcombe
293
The Founding of the Monastery Gangóji and a List of Its Treasures
299
Hagiography and History The Image of Prince Shôtoku William
316
A Childs Guide to Yasukuni Shrine Richard
334

Shingons Jiun Sonja and His Vinaya of the True Dharma
71
A Japanese Shugendô Apocryphal Text 1825
78
Eison and the Shingon Vinaya Sect Paul B Watt
89
Kokan Shirens Zen Precept Procedures William M Bodiford
98
GODS
113
From Ritual Performance to Stage Entertainment
124
A Modern Norito Cherish Pratt
135
SPIRITS
141
Japans First Shingon Ceremony David L Gardiner
153
Shingon Services for the Dead Richard Karl Payne
159
Genshins Deathbed Nembutsu Ritual in Pure Land Buddhism
166
Tales of Birth in the Pure Land
176
Epic and Religious Propaganda from the Ippen School of Pure Land
185
The Way to Memorialize Ones Mizuko
193
Jacqueline I Stone
199
The Contemplation of Suchness 12th c
200
The Purification Formula of the Nakatomi Mark Teeuwen
210
Dögens Lancet of Seated Meditation Carl Bielefeldt
220
Chidós Dreams of Buddhism William M Bodiford
235
En the Ascetic Linda Klepinger Keenan
343
The Founding of Mount Köya and Kūkais Eternal Meditation
354
Legends Miracles and Faith in Köbö Daishi and the Shikoku
360
A Personal Account of the Life of the Venerable Genkū Allan
370
Priest Nisshins Ordeals Jacqueline I Stone
384
Makuya Prayer Receiving the Holy Spirit and Bible Study
398
Muju Ichiens ShintoBuddhist Syncretism Robert E Morrell
415
Contested Orthodoxies in Five Mountains Zen Buddhism Joseph
423
Motoori Norinaga on the Two Shrines at Ise Mark Teeuwen
435
An Essay by Kuroda
451
Keizans Dream History 14th c
458
Toward a Postmodern Shinshū Theology Jan
468
Grassroots
487
Keizans Dream History William M Bodiford
501
Tökeiji Kamakuras Divorce Temple in Edo Popular Verse
523
Chinese Romanization Conversion Tables
551
Index
559
Plain Words on the Pure Land Way 1463
560
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Über den Autor (1999)

George J. Tanabe, Jr., is Professor and Chair in the Department of Religion at the University of Hawaii. Having research interests covering doctrinal and practical issues in medieval and modern Japan, he is the author of MyÉe the Dreamkeeper, coeditor of The Lotus Sutra in Japanese Culture, and coauthor of Practically Religious: Worldly Benefits and the Common Religion of Japan.

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