Glenny's Hand-book to the flower garden and greenhouse

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1850
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Seite 6 - ... requiring less warmth than a greenhouse affords, the preparation of the frame is a most important matter. The bottom should be firm and impervious to water, so that it may be kept as dry as possible, for which end, it should slope in any one direction, so that water spilled in watering the plants, may run into a gutter to be carried away outside the frame. The pots should stand upon a trellis a few inches from the floor, and this trellis is best made of narrow slips of wood, placed a little space...
Seite 3 - Make a slit in the bark of the stock, to reach from half an inch to an inch and a half down the stock, according to the size of the plant ; then make another short slit across, that you may easily raise the bark from the wood; then take a very thin slice of the bark from the tree or plant to be budded, a little below a leaf, and bring the knife out a little above it, so that you remove the leaf and the bud at its base, with the little slice you have taken. You will perhaps have removed a small bit...
Seite 6 - GENERAL MANAGEMENT OF FRAME PLANTS.— In the case of frame plants, or plants requiring less warmth than a greenhouse affords, the preparation of the frame is a most important matter. The bottom should be firm and impervious to water, so that it may be kept as dry as possible, for which end it should slope in any...
Seite 3 - ... bud at its base, with the little slice you have taken. You will perhaps have removed a small bit of the •wood with the bark, which you must take carefully out with the sharp point of your knife and your thumb; then tuck the bark and bud under the bark of the stock which you carefully bind over, letting the bud come at the part where the slits cross each other. No part of the stock should be allowed to grow after it is budded, except a little shoot or so, above the bud, just to draw the sap...
Seite xxi - TULIPS. THESE, on coming through the ground, generally crack the surface all over the bed, for the rains will have closed the compost at the top, until the spikes break it. The whole of the surface should be stirred, and any lumps bruised, so that it may be laid pretty even : it is of the greatest benefit to the bulbs to give them air, and of infinite service to the stems to lay the soil pretty close to them. In some kinds of loam, from the swelling of the bulb, and the progress of the spike through...
Seite 3 - ... principles as cuttings. — From the same, BUDDING. — This is performed when the leaves of plants have grown to their full size and the bud is to be seen at the base of it. The relative nature of the bud and the stock is the same as in grafting. Make a slit in the bark of the stock, to reach from half an inch to an inch and a half down the stock, according to the size of the plant ; then make another short slit across, that you may easily raise the bark from the wood; then take a very thin...
Seite xxi - It may be, however, that the plant is affected ; the outer leaf may have begun to rot, or, as is sometimes the case, may have so completely closed over the other as to prevent its growth, and even cause it, if neglected, to decay instead of grow. The decayed part must, in such cases, be entirely removed with a sharp knife, and the plant be laid bare down to the bulb. It should then be covered a few days with a...
Seite 111 - ... its pretty habit and abundant bloom are apparent at all times. Let the seed be sown in heat of some kind in March or April, and as soon as the plants are large enough to prick out, let them be placed an inch apart in wide-mouthed pots for three or four weeks, to save room while room is an object; they may be kept in the greenhouse. When they have grown till they touch one another almost, they may be potted separately in sixty-sized pots, (three inches across,) and placed under a garden light,...
Seite 251 - That gleam and glow amid the wintry scene ? Yes, here they are, aweary of the storms, And wrecking winds, and pinching frosts, that keep Within their darksome prison-house of earth The gay and spendthrift flowers; here they are, Lighting their ruddy beacons at the sun To melt away the snow. See, how it falls In drops of crystal from the glowing spray, Wreathed with deep crimson buds — the fairy fires.
Seite xxi - ... bulbs to give them air, and of infinite service to the stems to lay the soil pretty close to them. In some kinds of loam, from the swelling of the bulb, and the progress of the spike through the earth, it will be actually cracked, so as to almost show the bulb, which would thus be exposed to all the vicissitudes of the weather, and the attacks of insects, which could not find their way through crumbled earth, laying close, though lightly, on the bulb and round the stem.

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