Rupert of the Rhine: The History of a Brave Prince

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Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, 1868 - 191 Seiten

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Inhalt

CHAP
1
III
12
IV
25
V
33
VI
42
VII
56
VIII
64
XI
83
XIII
99
XIV
109
XV
118
XVI
129
XVII
141
XVIII
158
XIX
169
CLOSING YEARS
181

XII
92

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Seite 48 - O Lord, thou knowest how busy I must be this day. If I forget thee, do not thou forget me.
Seite 144 - Though the loss of Bristol be a great blow to me, yet your surrendering it as you did is of so much affliction to me, that it makes me not only forget the consideration of that place, but is likewise the greatest trial of my constancy that hath yet befallen me ; for what is to be doné, after one that is so near me as you are, both in blood and friendship, submits himself to so mean an action?
Seite 144 - I must remember you of your letter of the 12th of August whereby you assured me that, if no mutiny happened, you would keep Bristol for four months. Did you keep it four days ? Was there any thing like a mutiny ? More questions might be asked, but now I confess to little purpose.
Seite 144 - ... the greatest trial of my constancy that hath yet befallen me. For what is to be done after one that is so near me as you are, both in blood and friendship, submits himself to so mean an action ? (I give it the easiest term) such I have so much to say that I shall say no more of it...
Seite 64 - I think there is none that take me for a coward, for sure I fear not the face of any man alive ; yet I shall repute it the greatest victory in the world to see his Majesty enter London in peace, without shedding one drop of blood...
Seite 175 - In this fatal wreck, — besides a great many brave gentlemen, and others, — the sea, to glut itself, swallowed the Prince Maurice, whose fame the mouth of detraction cannot blast, his very enemies bewailing his loss. Many had more power, few more merit : he was snatched from us in obscurity, lest, beholding his loss would have prevented some from endeavouring their own safety : — so much he lived beloved, and died bewailed.
Seite 187 - In respect to his private life, he was so just, so beneficent, so courteous, that his memory remained dear to all who knew him. " This," observes Campbell, " I say of my own knowledge; having often heard old people in Berkshire speak in raptures of prince Rupert.
Seite 134 - ... the King, having not five thousand men in their power. When this has been told him, and that many of his officers and soldiers go from him to them, if he have no more consideration of such as stay, I must extremely lament their condition, being exposed to all ruin and slavery.
Seite 134 - MY LORD, It is now in everybody's mouth, that the King is going for Scotland. I must confess it to be a strange resolution ; considering not only in what condition he will leave all behind him, but what probability there is for him to get thither. If I were desired to deliver my opinion what other ways the King should take, this should be my opinion, which your Lordship may declare to the King. His Majesty hath now no way left to preserve his posterity, kingdom, and nobility, but by a treaty. I believe...
Seite 135 - Now, as for your opinion of my business, and your counsel thereupon, if I had any other quarrel but the defence of my religion, crown, and friends, you had full reason for your advice. For I confess that, speaking either as a mere soldier or statesman, I must say there is no probability but of my ruin ; yet, as a Christian, I must tell you, that God will not suffer rebels and traitors to prosper, nor this cause to be overthrown.

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