The London journal of arts and sciences (and repertory of patent inventions) [afterw.] Newton's London journal of arts and sciences

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William Newton
1855
 

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Seite 165 - ... reduced to its elements, and yield oxygen, which will chemically combine with the carbon of the iron, as well as with the sulphur or other oxidizable substances of the iron with which it may come into contact and have affinity, and thereby deprive the iron of those impurities ; whilst the other component of the steam, simultaneously liberated (namely, hydrogen), is free to combine with any sulphur present in the furnace, whether as an ingredient in the iron, or as a product of combustion of the...
Seite 265 - He at that time threw out an idea of applying the power of the steam-engine to the moving of wheelcarriages, and to other purposes, but the scheme was not matured, and was soon abandoned on his going abroad.
Seite 268 - Oh yes, perfectly. One Sunday afternoon I had gone to take a walk in the Green of Glasgow, and when about half-way between the Herd's House and...
Seite 246 - One of the most difficult problems to solve in this branch of manufacture is the production of dead surfaces. Although we know the nature and manipulation of the process, it is only the Parisian...
Seite 371 - The position of the neutral axis being thus ascertained to be in the centre, it was shewn, that not only the ultimate strength, but also the amount of extension and compression with a given strain, indicated the existence of another element of resistance, in addition to the resistances to extension and compression. Further consideration...
Seite 181 - Poncelet, Robison and the elder Leslie, as well as the engineers of the present day, had all agreed in practice, in omitting the more complicated part of Du Buat's formula ; in verification of this, a table was given, showing comparisons of the French experiments from 1732, down to those recently made by the Author, and exhibiting the most striking coincidences, of theory with practice ; the variations for practical purposes in the different rules being small, and the correction proposed by the Author...
Seite 5 - I do make use of some or one of those chemical compounds which are so easily inflammable as to be capable of taking fire and exploding without any actual fire being applied thereto, and merely by a blow, or by any sudden or strong pressure, or friction, given or applied thereto, without extraordinary violence; that is to say...
Seite 267 - Watt therefore came to the conclusion, that to make a perfect steamengine, it was necessary that the cylinder should be always as hot as the steam that entered it ; but it was equally necessary that the steam should be condensed when the piston descended — nay, that it should be cooled down below 100°, or a considerable amount of vapour would be given off, which would resist the descent of the piston, and diminish the power of the engine.
Seite 232 - ... the quantity of antimony should be diminished ; or, which is preferable, the metal should be re-purified. If this be not attended to, the alloy, although of great hardness, does not possess the tenacity or toughness necessary for type of extreme durability.
Seite 243 - One of this class of ships, of 2, 525 tons burthen, was stated to spread about 13,000 yards of canvas, in a single suit of sails. The early attempts to introduce auxiliary power on board East India traders, especially alluding to those by Messrs. Seawards, were mentioned, and the reasons given for their want of success. Arguing from the speed now attained by sailing clipper ships, and the successful application of screw propulsion, the author proposed the employment of iron sailing clipper ships,...

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