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The waters broke my hollow trance,
And with a temporary strength

My stiffen'd limbs were rebaptized.
My courser's broad breast proudly braves,
And dashes off the ascending waves
And onward we advance!
We reach the slippery shore at length,

A haven I but little prized, For all behind was dark and drear, And all before was night and fear. How many hours of night or day In those suspended pangs I lay, I could not tell; I scarcely knew If this were human breath I drew. “With glossy skin, and dripping mane,

And reeling limbs, and reeking flank, The wild steed's sinewy nerves still strain

Up the repelling bank. We gain the top: a boundless plain Spreads through the shadow of the night, And onward, onward, onward, seems

Like precipices in our dreams, To stretch beyond the sight."

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HEBREW MELODY.

When coldness wraps this suffering clay,

Ah, whither strays the immortal mind? It cannot die, it cannot stay,

But leaves its darken'd dust behind; Then, unembodied, doth it trace

By steps each planet's heavenly way? Or fill at once the realms of space,

A thing of eyes, that all survey? Eternal, boundless, undecay'd,

A thought unseen, but seeing all,
All, all in earth, or skies display'd,

Shall it survey, shall it recall :
Each fainter trace that memory holds,

So darkly of departed years,
In one broad glance the soul beholds,

And all that was, at once appears.
Before creation peopled earth,

Its eye shall roll through chaos back; And where the furthest heaven had birth,

The spirit trace its rising track.
And where the future mars or makes,

Its glance dilate o'er all to be,
While sun is quench’d or system breaks,

Fix'd in its own eternity.
Above or love, hope, hate, or fear,

It lives all passionless and pure:
An
age

shall feet like earthly year; Its years as moments shall endure. Away, away, without a wing,

O'er all, through all, its thoughts shall fly, A nameless and eternal thing,

Forgetting what it was to die.

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When all around grew drear and dark,

And reason half withheld her rayAnd hope but shed a dying spark

Which more misled my lonely way;

In that deep midnight of the mind,

And that internal strife of heart, When, dreading to be deemd too kind,

The weak despair-the cold depart; When fortune changed—and love fled far,

And hatred's shafts flew thick and fast, Thou wert the solitary star

Which rose and set not to the last.

Oh! blest be thine unbroken light!

That watch'd me as a seraph's eye, And stood between me and the night,

For ever shining sweetly nigh. And when the cloud upon us came,

Which strove to blacken o'er thy rayThen purer spread its gentle flame,

And dash'd the darkness all away. Still may thy spirit dwell on mine,

And teach it what to brave or brookThere's more in one soft word of thine,

Than in the world's defied rebuke. Thou stood'st, as stands a lovely tree,

That still unbroke, though gently bent, Still waves with fond fidelity

Its boughs above a monument. The winds might rend—the skies might pour

But there thou wert-and still wouldst be Devoted in the stormiest hour

To shed thy weeping leaves o'er me. But thou and thine shall know no blight,

Whatever fate on me may fall; For heaven in sunshine will requite

The kind—and thee the most of all.

Then let the ties of baffled love

Be broken-thine will never break; Thy heart can feel—but will not move;

Thy soul, though soft, will never shake. And these, when all was lost beside,

Were found, and still are fix'd, in theeAnd bearing still a breast so tried,

Earth is no desert-even to me.

ADDRESS TO THE OCEAN.

Roll on, thou deep and dark blue ocean-roll!
Ten thousand fleets sweep over thee in vain;
Man marks the earth with ruin-his control
Stops with the shore;-upon the watery plain
The wrecks are all thy deed, nor doth remain
A shadow of man's ravage, save his own,
When, for a moment, like a drop of rain,

He sinks into thy depths with bubbling groan, Without a grave, unknell’d, uncoffin'd, and unknown.

His steps are not upon thy paths—thy fields
Are not a spoil for him—thou dost arise
And shake him from thee; the vile strength he wields
For earth’s destruction thou dost all despise,
Spurning him from thy bosom to the skies,
And send'st him, shivering in thy playful spray
And howling, to his gods, where haply lies

His petty hope in some near port or bay,
And dashest him again to earth:—there let him lay.

The armaments which thunderstrike the walls
Of rock-built cities, bidding nations quake,
And monarchs tremble in their capitals-
The oak leviathans, whose huge ribs make
Their clay creator the vain title take
Of lord of thee, and arbiter of war;
These are thy toys, and, as the snowy flake,

They melt into thy yeast of waves, which mar
Alike the Armada’s pride, or spoils of Trafalgar.

Thy shores are empires, changed in all save thee-
Assyria, Greece, Rome, Carthage, what are they?
Thy waters wasted them while they were free,
And many a tyrant since; their shores obey
The stranger, slave, or savage; their decay
Has dried up realms to deserts :-not so thou,
Unchangeable save to thy wild waves' play-

Time writes no wrinkle on thine azure brow-
Such as creation's dawn beheld, thou rollest now.

Thou glorious mirror, where the Almighty's form
Glasses itself in tempests; in all time,
Calm or convulsed—in breeze, or gale, or storm,
Icing the pole, or in the torrid clime
Dark-heaving ;-boundless, endless, and sublime-

The image of eternity-the throne
Of the Invisible; even from out thy slime

The monsters of the deep are made ; each zone Obeys thee; thou goest forth, dread, fathomless, alune.

From Childe Harold.

ON THE DEATH OF THE PRINCESS CHARLOTTE.

Hark! forth from the abyss a voice proceeds,
A long low distant murmur of dread sound,
Such as arises when a nation bleeds
With some deep and immedicable wound;
Through storm and darkness yawns the rending ground,
The gulf is thick with phantoms, but the chief
Seems royal still, though with her head discrown'd,

And pale, but lovely, with maternal grief
She clasps a babe, to whom her breast yields no relief.

Scion of chiefs and monarchs, where art thou?
Fond hope of many nations, art thou dead?
Could not the grave forget thee, and lay low
Some less majestic, less beloved, head?
In the sad midnight, while thy heart still bled,
The mother of a moment, o'er thy boy,
Death hush'd that pang for ever: with thee fled

The present happiness and promised joy
Which tilld the imperial isles, so full it seem'd to cloy.

Peasants bring forth in safety.-Can it be,
O thou that wert so happy, so adored!
Those who weep not for kings shall weep for thee,
And Freedom's heart, grown heavy, cease to hoard
Her many griefs for One; for she had pour'd
Her orisons for thee, and o’er thy head
Beheld her Iris.—Thou, too, lonely lord,

And desolate consort—vainly wert thou wed;
The husband of a year! the father of the dead!

Of sackcloth was thy wedding garment made;
Thy bridal's fruit is ashes: in the dust
The fair-hair'd daughter of the isles is laid,
The love of millions! How we did entrust
Futurity to her! and, though it must

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