The New Monthly Magazine, Band 16

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Thomas Campbell, Samuel Carter Hall, Edward Bulwer Lytton Baron Lytton, Theodore Edward Hook, Thomas Hood, William Harrison Ainsworth
E. W. Allen, 1826

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Seite 258 - So every spirit, as it is most pure, And hath in it the more of heavenly light, So it the fairer body doth procure To habit in, and it more fairly dight, With cheerful grace and amiable sight. For, of the soul, the body form doth take, For soul is form, and doth the body make.
Seite 485 - Then said Paul unto him, God shall smite thee, thou whited wall : for sittest thou to judge me after the law, and commandest me to be smitten contrary to the law...
Seite 621 - Highland mountains and echoing streams, and of birchen glades breathing their balm, while the deer was seen glancing in sunshine remote, and the deep mellow crush of the wood-pigeon's note made music that sweetened the calm. Not a pastoral song has a pleasanter tune than ye speak to my heart, little wildings of June : of old ruinous castles ye tell, where I thought it delightful your beauties to find, when the magic of Nature first breathed on my mind, and your blossoms were part of her spell.
Seite 621 - YE field flowers ! the gardens eclipse you, 'tis true, Yet, wildings of Nature, I dote upon you, For ye waft me to summers of old, When the earth teemed around me with fairy delight And when daisies and buttercups gladdened my sight, Like treasures of silver and gold.
Seite 263 - The little careless darling of the wealthier nursery, in their hovel is transformed betimes into a premature reflecting person. No one has time to dandle it, no one thinks it worth while to coax it, to soothe it, to toss it up and down, to humour it.
Seite 141 - As soon as they can wipe off the sweat of the day, they must simper an hour, and catch cold in the princess's apartment ; from thence, as Shakspeare has it, — ' to dinner, with what appetite they may ;' — and after that, till midnight, walk, work, or think, which they please.
Seite 328 - BIRDS OF PASSAGE. BIRDS, joyous birds of the wandering wing ! Whence is it ye come with the flowers of spring! — " We come from the shores of the green old Nile, From the land where the roses of Sharon smile, From the palms that wave through the Indian sky, From the myrrh-trees of glowing Araby. " We have swept o'er cities in song...
Seite 518 - THE SUNBEAM THOU art no lingerer in monarch's hall — A joy thou art, and a wealth to all ! A bearer of hope unto land and sea — Sunbeam ! what gift hath the world like thee ? Thou art walking the billows, and ocean smiles ; Thou hast...
Seite 621 - Even now what affections the violet awakes; What loved little islands, twice seen in their lakes, Can the wild water-lily restore ; What landscapes I read in the primrose's looks, And what pictures of pebbled and minnowy brooks, In the vetches that tangled their shore. Earth's cultureless buds, to my heart ye were dear, Ere the fever of passion, or ague of fear, Had scathed my existence's bloom ; Once I welcome you more, in life's passionless stage, With the visions of youth to revisit my age, And...
Seite 38 - ... fanciful speculation by a grumbler in a corner, who declared it was a shame to make all this rout about a mere player and farce-writer, to the neglect and exclusion of the fine old dramatists, the contemporaries and rivals of Shakspeare.

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