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THOMAS R. LOUNSBURY

PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH IN THE SHEFFIELD SCIENTIFIC SCHOOL

OF YALE UNIVERSITY

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CONTENTS OF VOL. III.

His position among English poets, 3, 4; vicissitudes in his rep-

utation, t, 5; difficulty of the investigation, 5-7; continuous

popularity of great writers, 7-9; Chaucer no exception, 9, 10;

recognition by contemporaries, 10-15; by Gower, Scogan, and

the author of the ‘Testament of Love,' 10, 11; by Occleve and

Lydgate, 11, 12; imitation by Froissart, 13; tribute of Eustache

Deschamps, 13-15; early popularity in Scotland, 15-18; imi-

tated by James I., Henryson, Dunbar, and Gawin Douglas, 18–

22; popularity in the fifteenth century, 22–33; Occleve and

Lydgate and their tributes, 22-27; sterility of the century, 27-

30; mentioned constantly with Gower and Lydgate, 30-33;

invention of printing followed by numerous editions of Chau-

cer's works, 33; popularity in the sixteenth century, 33–72;

number of editions issued. 33. 34; popularity with the Puri-

tans, 34-41; admiration expressed by writers of the time, 41,

42; by Spenser, 42-46; literary controversies in the sixteenth

century as related to Chaucer, 46–65; conflict of the classical

and the modern movement, 46-48; the controversy about ver-

sification, 48-51; supposed irregularity of Chaucer's versifica-

tion, 51-54; sixteenth-century pronunciation of Chaucer, 54-

58; controversy as to the diction of poetry, 58, 59; revival of

Chaucer's words, 59-65; blunders as to his reputation in the

Elizabethan age, 65-67; Chaucer and the drama, 67 - 70;

Gower's recognized inferiority, 70-72; Chaucer's reputation

touches its lowest point in the seventeenth century, 73; Earle's

remark, 74; admiration expressed by Milton, 74-76; Kynas-

ton's Latin translation, 76-82; desirability then felt of trans-

lating English works into Latin, 82-84; comments and views

of Pepys and Mennis on Chaucer, 84-88; Braithwaite's com-

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