The History of Pendennis: His Fortunes and Misfortunes, His Friends and His Greatest Enemy

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Smith, Elder, 1898 - 752 Seiten
 

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Seite 741 - I do not like thee, Dr. Fell ; the reason why I cannot tell,
Seite xlviii - Since the author of Tom Jones was buried, no writer of fiction among us has been permitted to depict to his utmost power a MAN.
Seite 62 - I think you do," said Miss Costigan, perhaps with a sort of pity for Pen. Think he did ! Of course here Mr. Pen went off into a rhapsody which, as we have perfect command over our own feelings, we have no right to overhear. Let the poor boy fling out his simple heart at the woman's feet, and deal gently with him. It is best to love wisely, no doubt : but to love foolishly is better than not to be able to love at all.
Seite 616 - I see the truth in that man, as I do in his brother, whose logic drives him to quite a different conclusion, and who, after having passed a life in vain endeavours to reconcile an irreconcilable book, flings it at last down in despair, and declares, with tearful eyes, and hands up to heaven, his revolt and recantation.
Seite 742 - The man that lays his hand upon a woman, Save in the way of kindness, is a wretch Whom 'twere gross flattery to name a coward.
Seite 297 - ... dressed, and (must it be owned?) somewhat dirty, — were here smoking and drinking, and vociferously applauding the songs; young university bucks were to be found here, too, with that indescribable genteel simper which is only learned at the knees of Alma Mater; — and handsome young guardsmen, and florid bucks from the St. James's Street Clubs — nay, senators English and Irish; and even members of the House of Peers.
Seite xvi - your idleness is incorrigible and your stupidity beyond example. You are a disgrace to your school, and to your family, and I have no doubt will prove so in after-life to your country. If that vice, sir, which is described to us as the root of all evil, be really what moralists have represented...
Seite 308 - ALTHOUGH I enter not, Yet round about the spot Ofttimes I hover ; And near the sacred gate, With longing eyes I wait, Expectant of her. The Minster bell tolls out Above the city's rout, And noise and humming : They've hush'd the Minster bell : The organ 'gins to swell : She's coming, she's coming...
Seite 302 - Covent Garden. Look ! here comes the Foreign Express galloping in. They will be able to give news to Downing Street tomorrow : funds will rise or fall, fortunes be made or lost ; Lord B. will get up, and, holding the paper in his hand, and seeing the noble Marquis in his place, will make a great speech ; and — Mr.
Seite 1 - At a quarter past ten the Major invariably made his appearance in the best blacked boots in all London, with a checked morning cravat that never was rumpled until dinner-time, a buff waistcoat which bore the crown of his sovereign on the buttons, and linen so spotless that Mr.