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Mild Arcadians, ever blooming, 5

Nightly nodding o'er your flocks,
See my weary days consuming
All beneath yon flowery rocks.

Thus the Cyprian goddess weeping,

Mourn'd Adonis, darling youth! 10

Him the boar, in silence creeping,

Gor'd with unrelenting tooth. i

Cynthia! tune harmonious numbers;

Fair Discretion! string the lyre!

Sooth my ever-waking slumbers; IS

Bright Apollo! lend thy choir.

Gloomy Pluto! king of terrors,

Arm'd in adamantine chains,

Lead me to the chrystal mirrors,

Watering soft Elysian plains. 20

Mournful cypress, verdant willow,

Gilding my Aurelia's brows,

Morpheus hovering o'er my pillow,

Hear me pay my dying vows. •

Melancholy smooth Mseander 25

Swiftly purling in a round,

On thy margin lovers wander, /

With thy flow'ry chaplets crown'd.

Thus when Philomela drooping,

Softly seeks her silent mate, SO

See the bird of Juno stooping;

Melody resigns to Fate.

MACER.

A CHARACTER.

When simple Macer, now of high renown,
First sought a poet's fortune in the'town,
'Twas all th' ambition his high soul could feel
To wear red stockings, and to dine with Steele:

Some ends of verse his betters might afford, "i

And gave the harmless fellow a good word.
Set up with these he ventur'd on the town,
And with a borrow'd play outdid poor Crown.
There he stopp'd short, nor since has writ a tittle,
But has the wit to make the most of little; 19

Like stunted hide-bound trees, that just have got
Sufficient sap at once to bear and rot.
Now he begs verse, and what he gets commends,
Not of the wits his foes, but fools his friends.

So some coarse country-wench, almost decay'd, 15
Trudges to town, and first turns chambermaid;
Awkward and supple each devoir to pay,
She flatters her good lady twice a-day;
Thought wond'rous honest, tho'of mean degree,
And strangely lik'd for her simplicity: SO

In a translated suit then tries the town,
With borrow'd pins, and patches not her own;
But just endurM the winter she becran,
And in four months a batter'd harridan:
Now nothing left, tut wither'd, pale, and shrunk,
To bawd for others, and go shares with punk. SB

ON

A CERTAIN LADY AT COURT.

I Know the thing that's most uncommon;
(Envy be silent and attend!)
I know a reasonable woman,
Handsome and witty, yet a friend.

Not warp'd by passion, aw'd by rumour, i

Not grave through pride, nor gay through folly,
An equal mixture of good humour,
And sensible soft melancholy.

"Has she not faults then (Envy says), sir i"'
Yes, she has one, I must aver; 16

When all the world conspires to praise her,
The woman's deaf, and does not hear.

VERBATIM FROM BOILEAU.

Un jour, dit un auteur, &c. Once (says an author, where I need not say) Two travellers found an oyster in their way: Both fierce, both hungry, the dispute grew strong, While, scale in hand, dame Justice pass'd along. Before her each with clamour pleads the laws, £ Explain'd the matter, and would win the cause. Dame Justice weighing long the doubtful right, Takes, opens, swallows it before their sight. The cause of strife remov'd so rarely well, There take (says Justice), take ye each a shell. We thrive at Westminster on fools like you: 'Twas a fat oyster—live in peace—Adieu."

19

ANSWER

TO THE FOLLOWING QUESTION OF MRS. HOWE.

"what is prudery?

'Tis a beldam,

Seen with wit and beauty seldom.

Tis a fear that starts at shadows;

Tis (no, 'tis n't) like Miss Meadows. £

Tis a virgin hard of feature,

Old, and void of all good-nature;

Lean and fretful; would seem wise,

Yet plays the fool before she dies.

Tis an ugly envious shrew, 1°

That rails at dear Lepell and you.

OCCASIONED BY

SOME VERSES

OF HIS GRACE THE DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM.

Muse, 'tis enough, at length thy labour ends,
And thou shalt live, for Buckingham commends.

Let crowds of critics now my verse assail,
Let Dennis write, and nameless numbers rail;
This more than pays whole years of thankless paiD;
Time, health, and fortune, are not lost in vain. (
Sheffield approves, consenting Phoebus bends,
And I and Malice from this hour are friends.

ON HIS GROTTO AT TWICKENHAM,

COMPOSED OP MARBLES, SPARS, GEMS, ORES,
AND MINERALS.

I uou who shalt stop where Thames' translucent

wave *

Shines a broad mirror through the shady cave;
Where lingering drops from mineral roots distil,
And pointed crystals break the sparkling rill;
IJnpolish'd gems no ray on pride bestow, i

And latent metals innocently glow;
Approach. Great nature studiously behold!
And eye the mine without a wish for gold.
Approach; but awful! Jo! th' iEgerian grot,
Where, nobly pensive, St. John sat and thought, 10
Where British sighs froth dying Wyndham stole,
And the bright flame was shot through Marchmont's

soul.
Let such, such only, tread this sacred floor,
Who dare to love their country and be poor.

[graphic]

THE

DUNCIAD.

A LETTER TO THE PUBLISHER;

Occasioned by

THE FIRST CORRECT EDITION

Of

THE DUNCIAD. It is with pleasure I hear that you have procured a correct copy of the Dunciad, which the many surreptitious ones have rendered so necessary; and it is yet with more, that I am informed it will be attended -with a Commentary; a work so requisite, that I cannot think the author himself would have omitted it, had he approved of the first appearance of this poem. 'Such Notes as have occurred to me I herewith send vou - you will oblige me by inserting them amongst those which are, or will be, transmitted to you by others; since not only the author's friends, but even strangers, appear engaged by humanity, to take some care of an orphan of so much gemus and spirit, which its parent seems to have abandoned from the very beginning, and suffered to step into the world naked, unguarded, and unattended.

It was upon reading some of the abusive papers lately published, that my great regard to a person whose friendship. I esteem as one of the chief honour* of my life, and a much greater respect to truth than to him or any man living, engaged me in enquiries of which the enclosed Notes are the fruit.

I perceived that most of these authors had been (doubtless very wisely) the first aggressors. They had tried till they were weary, what was to be got by railing at each other: no body was either concerned or surprised if this or that scribbler was proved a dunce, but ev«ry one was curious to read what could

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