Coleridge and the Conservative Imagination

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Mercer University Press, 2003 - 286 Seiten
Why should anyone bother with Coleridge either as a theologian or a political theorist? At first in desperation, but now quite deliberately, Alan Gregory convincingly suggests that one should bother because Coleridge mounted an imporant critique of reductionist explanations of human society and moral agency, and because Coleridge has much regarding that important enterprise to teach us still. While Gregory also offers a perceptive outline of early British conservatism, his main concern is with Coleridge's attack on reductionism, including his defense of the will against associationism, his criticisms of Enlightenment historiography, his discussions of the inadequacies of political economy, and the Trinitarian arguments against monism. There is, Gregory remarks, no grasping the range or inner dynamic of Coleridge's thought without appreciating his religious vision, his theology. Indeed, Coleridge himself affirmed that should we try to conceive a man without the ideas of God, eternity, freedom, will, absolute truth, of the good, the true, the beautiful, the infinite...the man will have vanished.

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Inhalt

Preface
7
Philosophical Psychology and Conservative Politics
39
Imagination and the Wisdom of History
71
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (2003)

Alan P. R. Gregory is associate professor of Church History, Episcopal Theological Seminary of the Southwest (Austin).

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