The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: Including a Journal of His Tour to the Hebrides, Band 3

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Derby & Jackson, 1858
 

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Seite 129 - Knowledge is of two kinds. We know a subject ourselves, or we know where we can find information upon it.
Seite 270 - Pray give me leave, Sir; — It is better here — A little of the brown— Some fat, Sir— A little of the stuffing — Some gravy — Let me have the pleasure of giving you some butter— Allow me to recommend a squeeze of this orange ; or the lemon, perhaps, may have more zest." — " Sir, Sir, I am obliged to you, Sir...
Seite 354 - Why, sir, you find no man, at all intellectual, who is willing to leave London. No, sir, when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life ; for there is in London all that life can afford.
Seite 113 - The greatest part of a writer's time is spent in reading, in order to write: a man will turn over half a library to make one book.
Seite 199 - Whoe'er has travell'd life's dull round, Where'er his stages may have been, May sigh to think he still has found The warmest welcome at an inn.
Seite 268 - And if Jack Wilkes should be there, what is that to me, Sir? My dear friend, let us have no more of this. I am sorry to be angry with you; but really it is treating me strangely to talk to me as if I could not meet any company whatever, occasionally.
Seite 244 - The grand object of travelling is to see the shores of the Mediterranean. On those shores were the four great Empires of the world ; the Assyrian, the Persian, the Grecian, and the Roman. — All our religion, almost all our law, almost all our arts, almost all that sets us above savages, has come to us from the shores of the Mediterranean.
Seite 99 - Lord Pembroke said once to me at Wilton, with a happy pleasantry, and some truth, that ' Dr. Johnson's sayings would not appear so extraordinary, were it not for his bow-wow way ' : but I admit the truth of this only on some occasions.
Seite 180 - Oft in danger, yet alive, We are come to thirty-five; Long may better years arrive, Better years than thirty-five. Could philosophers contrive Life to stop at thirty-five, Time his hours should never drive O'er the bounds of thirty-five. High to soar, and deep to dive, Nature gives at thirty-five. Ladies, stock and tend your hive, Trifle not at thirty-five: For howe'er we boast and strive, Life declines from thirty-five: He that ever hopes to thrive Must begin by thirty-five; And all who wisely wish...
Seite 198 - The master of the house is anxious to entertain his guests ; the guests are anxious to be agreeable to him : and no man but a very impudent dog indeed can as freely command what is in another man's house as if it were his own. Whereas at a tavern there is a general freedom from anxiety. You are sure you are welcome : and the more noise you make, the more trouble you give, the more good things you call for, the welcomer you are.

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