The Florist, Fruitist, and Garden Miscellany, Band 11

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"Florist" office, 1858
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Seite 288 - God Almighty first planted a garden; and, indeed, it is the purest of human pleasures; it is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross handyworks...
Seite 274 - ... upon their standing at equal distances. In the months of May and June, if the seeds are sound, the young plants will appear. When they have made three or four leaves, take away all but three of the best plants from each circle, planting out those you pull up (which by a careful hand may be drawn with all their tap-root) in a spare bed for extra-forcing, or to repair accidents.
Seite 274 - ... the first year. In the spring of the second year, when the plants are beginning to push, rake off the stable litter, digging a little of the most rotten into the alleys, and add another inch in depth of fresh loam and sand. Abstain from cutting this year, though some of the plants will probably rise very strong, treating the beds the succeeding winter exactly as before. The third season, a little before the plants begin to stir, rake off the winter covering, laying on an inch in depth of pure...
Seite 78 - She is the fairies' midwife, and she comes In shape no bigger than an agate stone On the forefinger of an alderman, Drawn with a team of little atomies Athwart men's noses as they lie asleep; Her waggon spokes made of long spinners...
Seite 274 - In the spring of the second year, when the plants are beginning to push, rake off the stable litter, digging a little of the most rotten into the alleys, and add another inch in depth of fresh loam and sand. Abstain from cutting this year, though some of the plants will probably rise very strong, treating the beds the succeeding winter exactly as before. The third season, a little before the plants begin to stir, rake off the winter covering, laying on now an inch in depth of pure dry sand or fine...
Seite 78 - A rosebud set with little wilful thorns, And sweet as English air could make her, she : But Walter hail'da score of names upon her, And 'petty Ogress,' and 'ungrateful Puss,' And swore he long'd at college, only long'd, All else was well, for she-society.
Seite 274 - ... six weeks, after which period the plants should be uncovered, and their leaves suffered to grow, that they may acquire and return nutriment to the root for the next year's buds. The flowers, when seeds are not wanted, ought to be nipped off with the finger and thumb, when they appear.
Seite 274 - Tery strong, treating the beds the succeeding winter exactly as before. The third season, a little before the plants begin to stir, rake off the winter covering, laying on now an inch in depth of pure dry sand, or fine gravel. Then cover each parcel with one of the blanching pots, pressing it very firmly into the ground, so as to exclude all light and air; for the colour and flavour of the Sea Kale is greatly injured by being exposed to either.
Seite 274 - ... in a heap and been turned over at least three times the preceding summer ; this, and indeed all composts, should be kept scrupulously free from weeds, many of which nourish insects, and the compost is too often filled with their eggs and grubs. Upon this dressing of sandy loam throw about...
Seite 37 - Shelley the best nineteenth; and I do not think I am going too far when I say that Mr.

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