Charles Darwin and Other English Thinkers: With Reference to Their Religious and Ethical Value

Cover
Pilgrim Press, 1911 - 284 Seiten
This early 20th-century work contains a series of lectures delivered before the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Science in 1910.

Im Buch

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 225 - But now I only hear Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar, Retreating, to the breath Of the night-wind, down the vast edges drear And naked shingles of the world.
Seite 252 - It seeks to do away with classes ; to make the best that has been thought and known in the world current everywhere; to make all men live in an atmosphere of sweetness and light, where they may use ideas, as it uses them itself, freely, — nourished, and not bound by them. This is the social idea ; and the men of culture are the true apostles of equality.
Seite 46 - And though all the winds of doctrine were let loose to play upon the earth, so Truth be in the field, we do injuriously, by licensing and prohibiting, to misdoubt her strength. Let her and Falsehood grapple; who ever knew Truth put to the worse, in a free and open encounter?
Seite 102 - At this my heart sank within me: the whole foundation on which my life was constructed fell down. All my happiness was to have been found in the continual pursuit of this end. The end had ceased to charm, and how could there ever again be any interest in the means? I seemed to have nothing left to live for.
Seite 215 - And yet, steeped in sentiment as she lies, spreading PREFACE. xi her gardens to the moonlight, and whispering from her towers the last enchantments of the Middle Age, who will deny that Oxford, by her ineffable charm, keeps ever calling us nearer to the true goal of all of us, to the ideal, to perfection...
Seite 58 - ... whose mind is stored with a knowledge of the great and fundamental truths of Nature and of the laws of her operations; one who, no stunted ascetic, is full of life and fire, but whose passions are trained to come to heel by a vigorous will, the servant of a tender conscience who has learned to love all beauty, whether of Nature or of art, to hate all vileness, and to respect others as himself.
Seite 240 - Plainness and clearness without shadow of stain! Clearness divine! Ye Heavens, whose pure dark regions have no sign Of languor, though so calm, and though so great Are yet untroubled and unpassionate: Who though so noble share in the world's toil, And though so task'd keep free from dust and soil...
Seite 100 - I now had opinions; a creed, a doctrine, a philosophy; in one among the best senses of the word, a religion; the inculcation and diffusion of which could be made the principal outward purpose of a life.
Seite 58 - ... ascetic, is full of life and fire, but whose passions are trained to come to heel by a vigorous will, the servant of a tender conscience ; who has learned to love all beauty, whether of Nature or of art, to hate all vileness, and to respect others as himself. Such...
Seite 57 - That man, I think, has had a liberal education who has been so trained in youth that his body is the ready servant of his will, and does with ease and pleasure all the work that, as a mechanism, it is capable of...

Bibliografische Informationen