The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman: & A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy, Band 1

Cover
Macmillan and Company, limited, 1900
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 160 - AND how did Garrick speak the soliloquy last night ' — Oh, against all rule, my Lord, — most ungrammatically ! betwixt the substantive and the adjective, which should agree together in number, case, and gender, he made a breach thus, — stopping, as if the point wanted settling ; — and betwixt the nominative case, which your lordship knows should govern the verb, he suspended his voice in the epilogue a dozen times three seconds and three fifths by a stop-watch, my Lord, each time.
Seite 34 - Could a historiographer drive on his history, as a muleteer drives on his mule, — straight forward; for instance, from Rome all the way to Loretto, without ever once turning his head aside either to the right hand or to the left, — he might venture to foretell you to an hour when he should get to his journey's end; but the thing is, morally speaking, impossible...
Seite 161 - Of all the cants which are canted in this canting world, though the cant of hypocrites may be the worst, — the cant of criticism is the most tormenting! I would go fifty miles on foot, for I have not a horse worth riding on, to kiss the hand of that man whose generous heart will give up the reins of his imagination into his author's hands, be pleased he knows not why, and cares not wherefore.
Seite 155 - God. may he (Obadiah) be damned (for tying these knots). We excommunicate and anathematize him, and from the thresholds of the holy church of God Almighty we sequester him, that he may be tormented, disposed and delivered over with Dathan and Abiram, and with those who say unto the Lord God, ' Depart from us, we desire none of thy ways.
Seite 65 - That tho' my digressions are all fair, as you observe, — and that I fly off from what I am about, as far, and as often too, as any writer in Great Britain; yet I constantly take care to order affairs so that my main business does not stand still in my absence.
Seite 327 - Had he flung it, or thrown it, or cast it, or skimmed it, or squirted it, or let it slip or fall in any possible direction under heaven, — or in the best direction that could be given to it, — had he dropped it like a...
Seite 35 - For, if he is a man of the least spirit, he will have fifty deviations from a straight line to make with this or that party as he goes along, which he can no ways avoid. He will have views and prospects to himself perpetually soliciting his eye, which he can no more help standing still to look at than he can fly...
Seite 254 - I am this month one whole year older than I was this time twelve-month; and having got, as you perceive, almost into the middle of my fourth volume1 — and no farther than to my first day's life — 'tis demonstrative that I have three hundred and sixty-four days more life to write just now, than when I first set out...
Seite 100 - Toby had scarce a heart to retaliate upon a fly. —Go, says he one day at dinner, to an overgrown one which had buzzed about his nose, and tormented him cruelly all dinner-time, and which after infinite attempts he had caught at last, as it flew by him ; — I'll not hurt thee, says my uncle Toby, rising from his chah-, and going across the room, with the fly in his hand, I'll not hurt a hair of thy head : — Go...
Seite 58 - That this strange irregularity in our climate, producing so strange an irregularity in our characters, doth thereby, in some sort, make us amends, by giving us somewhat to make us merry with when the weather will not suffer us to go out of doors ; — that observation is my own ; — and was struck out by me this very rainy day, March 26, 1759, and betwixt the hours of nine and ten in the morning.

Bibliografische Informationen