The Naturalist, Band 1;Band 124,Ausgabe 1028

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Simpkin, Marshall, 1865
 

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Seite 134 - ... Details of the latter description are supplied in great abundance, and in such a form as to render the volume a very pleasant and agreeable book of reference. The work, indeed, seems well suited for the class of persons for whose use, as the preface tells us, it is especially intended — that is, "for persons who take an interest in plants and flowers, whether wild or growing in gardens, and who are •wishful to acquire a knowledge of such portions of botanical science as are useful, agreeable,...
Seite 253 - A good-sized test-tube answers better than a bottle for putting them up, as it admits of closer examination of the animal. The only drawback to this process is, that unless the solution is of sufficient strength, and unless the tentacles are extruded when the animal is immersed, it generally, but not invariably, fails. Some slugs appear to be more' susceptible to the action of the fluid than others ; and it generally answers better with fullgrown than with young specimens. But if successful, the...
Seite 112 - ... marked. It seems that the bark was cut off and the letters cut in, after which the next year's wood grew over it, but without adhering where the bark had been cut. The cyphers are of James the First, of William and Mary ; and one of King John!
Seite 215 - The birds of the air, the beasts of the field, and the fishes of the sea, say that God is love...
Seite 360 - President, after referring to the loss which the Society had sustained in the death of Dr. Corrie, the venerable Master of Jesus' College, exhibited and described a stone cross-head, presented by the Royal Architectural Museum, Westminster.
Seite 110 - These spiders," says De Geer, " spin in the water a cell of strong, closely woven, white silk in the form of half the shell of a pigeon's egg, or like a diving-bell. This is sometimes left partly above water, but at others is entirely submersed, and is always attached to the objects near it by a great number of irregular threads.
Seite 131 - According to Professor Williamson the young Melicerta commences her house by secreting " a thin hyaline cylinder," and the first row of pellets are deposited, not at the base as would be expected, but in a ring about the middle of the tube. " At first new additions are made to both extremities of the enlarging ring; but the jerking constrictions of the animal at length force the caudal end of the cylinder down upon the leaf, to which it becomes securely cemented by the same viscous secretion as causes...
Seite 253 - Make a cold saturated solution of corrosive sublimate ; put it into a deep wide mouthed bottle, then take the slug you wish to preserve and let it crawl on a long slip of card. When the tentacles are fully extended, plunge it suddenly into the solution ; in a few minutes it will die, with the tentacles fully extended in the most life-like manner, so much so, indeed, that if taken out of the fluid it would be difficult to say whether it be alive or dead. The slugs thus prepared should not be mounted...
Seite 112 - The cyphers when found, were of James I., of William and Mary, and one of King John. The latter was eighteen inches within the tree, and more than a foot from the centre ; so...
Seite 240 - Snipe ; but it is only about half its weight, seldom exceeding two ounces, or measuring more, from the tip of its beak to the end of its tail, than eight inches and a half.

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