Ambarvalia: Poems

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Chapman and Hall, 1849 - 155 Seiten
 

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Seite 50 - E'en so — but why the tale reveal Of those, whom year by year unchanged, Brief absence joined anew to feel, Astounded, soul from soul estranged...
Seite 51 - To veer, how vain ! On, onward strain, Brave barks! In light, in darkness too. Through winds and tides one compass guides — To that, and your own selves, be true. But O blithe breeze! and O great seas, Though ne'er, that earliest parting past, On your wide plain they join again, Together lead them home at last. One port, methought. alike they sought, One purpose hold where'er they fare, — O bounding breeze. O rushing seas! At last, at last, unite them there!
Seite 63 - Is it true, ye gods, who treat us As the gambling fool is treated, O ye, who ever cheat us, And let us feel we're cheated ! Is it true that poetical power, The gift of heaven, the dower Of Apollo and the Nine, The inborn sense, 'the vision and the faculty divine...
Seite 43 - How often sit I, poring o'er My strange distorted youth, Seeking in vain, in all my store, One feeling based on truth; Amid the maze of petty life A clue whereby to move, A spot whereon in toil and strife To dare to rest and love. So constant as my heart would be, So fickle as it must, 'Twere well for others as for me 'Twere dry as summer dust.
Seite 27 - Man ! But turn not then to seek again What first the ill began ; No God, it saith ; ah, wait in faith God's self-completing plan ; Receive it not, but leave it not, And wait it out, O Man ! ' The Man that went the cloud within Is gone and vanished quite ; He cometh not...
Seite 44 - My strange distorted youth, Seeking in vain, in all my store, One feeling based on truth; Amid the maze of petty life A clue whereby to move, A spot whereon in toil and strife To dare to rest and love. So constant as my heart would be, So fickle as it must, 'Twere well for others as for me 'Twere dry as summer dust.
Seite 32 - Are there not, then, two musics unto men? — One loud and bold and coarse, And overpowering still perforce All tone and tune beside ; Yet in despite its pride Only of fumes of foolish fancy bred, And sounding solely in the sounding head : The other, soft and low, Stealing whence we not know, Painfully heard, and easily forgot, With pauses oft and many a silence strange (And silent oft it seems, when silent it is not), Revivals too of unexpected change : Haply thou think'st 'twill never be begun,...
Seite 2 - I know not, I will do my duty, said the last. Thy duty do ? rejoined the voice, Ah, do it, do it, and rejoice; But...
Seite 18 - Nor times shall lack, when while the work it plies, Unsummoned powers the blinding film shall part, And scarce by happy tears made dim, the eyes In recognition start. But, as thou wiliest, give or e'en forbear The beatific supersensual sight, So, with Thy blessing blest, that humbler prayer Approach Thee morn and night.
Seite 23 - And say in bitter grief, The day behold, at first foretold, Of atheist unbelief: Take better part, with manly heart, Thine adult spirit can ; Receive it not, believe it not, Believe it not, O Man ! As men at dead of night awaked With cries,

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