Some Thoughts Concerning Education

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A. and J. Churchill, 1693 - 262 Seiten
 

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I
1
II
52
III
102
IV
152
V
201
VI
251

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Seite 45 - Art; and he that has found a way, how to keep up a Child's Spirit, easy, active and free; and yet, at the same time, to restrain him from many things he has a Mind to, and to draw him to things that are uneasy to him; he, I say, that knows how to reconcile these seeming Contradictions, has, in my Opinion, got the true Secret of Education.
Seite 31 - As the strength of the body lies chiefly in being able to endure hardships, so also does that of the mind. And the great principle and foundation of all virtue and worth is placed in this, that a man is able to deny himself his own desires, cross his own inclinations, and purely follow what reason directs as best, though the appetite lean the other way.
Seite 2 - I think I may say, that of all the men we meet with, nine parts of ten are what they are, good or evil, useful or not, by their education.
Seite 189 - ... several occasions, but especially if he travel, as that which helps a man often to express, in a few lines well put together, what a whole sheet of paper in writing would not be able to represent and make intelligible.
Seite 31 - I do not doubt but it is, viz. that the difference to be found in the manners and abilities of men is owing more to their education than to any thing else...
Seite 102 - ... one fit to educate and form the mind of a young gentleman is not every where to be found; and that more than ordinary care is to be taken in the , choice of him, or else you may fail of your end.
Seite 39 - For Liberty and Indulgence can do no good to Children; their Want of Judgment makes them stand in need of Restraint and Discipline; and on the contrary, Imperiousness and Severity is but an ill Way of Treating Men, who have Reason of their own to guide them...
Seite 211 - ... that he knew the limits of the four parts of the world, could readily point, being asked, to any country upon the globe, or any county in the map of England ; knew all the great rivers, promontories, straits, and bays in the world, and could find the longitude and latitude of any place, before he was six years old.
Seite 53 - Esteem and Disgrace are, of all others, the most powerful Incentives to the Mind, when once it is brought to relish them. If you can once get into Children a Love of Credit, and an Apprehension of Shame and Disgrace, you have put into them the true Principle, which will constantly work, and incline them to the right.
Seite 259 - There are a thousand other things that may need consideration; especially if one should take in the various tempers, different inclinations, and particular defaults, that are to be found in children; and prescribe proper remedies. The variety is so great, that it would require a volume; nor would that reach it. Each man's mind has some peculiarity, as well as his face, that distinguishes him from all others; and there are possibly scarce two children, who can be conducted by exactly the same method.

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