Handbuch der englischen sprache und literature, Band 1

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Seite 367 - How much more than is necessary do we spend in sleep, forgetting, that The sleeping fox catches no poultry, and that There will be sleeping enough in the grave, as Poor Richard says.
Seite 367 - ... as Poor Richard says." They joined in desiring him to speak his mind, and gathering round him, he proceeded as follows. "Friends," says he, "and neighbors, the taxes are indeed very heavy, and, if those laid on by the government were the only ones we had to pay, we might more easily discharge them; but we have many others, and much more grievous to some of us. We are taxed twice as much by our idleness, three times as much by our pride, and four times as much by our folly; and from these taxes...
Seite 367 - Let us then up and be doing, and doing to the purpose, so by diligence shall we do more with less perplexity. ' Sloth makes all things difficult, but industry all easy, and he that riseth late must trot all day, and shall scarce overtake his business at night ; while laziness travels so slowly, that poverty soon overtakes him. Drive thy business, let not that drive thee; and early to bed, and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise,
Seite 370 - You call them goods; but if you do not take care they will prove evils to some of you. You expect they will be sold cheap, and perhaps they may for less than they cost; but if you have no occasion for them they must be dear to you.
Seite 369 - A little neglect may breed great mischief: for want of a nail the shoe was lost ; for want of a shoe the horse was lost ; and for want of a horse the rider was lost, being overtaken and slain by the enemy ; all for want of a little care about a horse-shoe naiL
Seite 337 - His persons act and speak by the influence of those general passions and principles by which all minds are agitated, and the whole system of life is continued in motion.
Seite 112 - I have ever hated all nations, professions, and communities; and all my love is towards individuals. For instance, I hate the tribe of lawyers; but I love Counsellor Such-a-one, and Judge Such-a-one. It is so with physicians. I will not speak of my own trade, soldiers, English, Scotch, French, and the rest. But principally I hate and detest that animal called man, although I heartily love John, Peter, Thomas, and so forth.
Seite 436 - Oft on a plat of rising ground I hear the far-off curfew sound, Over some wide-watered shore Swinging slow with sullen roar ; Or, if the air will not permit, Some still removed place will fit, Where glowing embers through the room Teach light to counterfeit a gloom...
Seite 231 - The blood and spirits of Le Fevre, which were waxing cold and slow within him, and were retreating to their last citadel, the heart, — rallied back, — the film forsook his eyes for a moment ; — he looked up wishfully in my uncle Toby's face ; — then cast a look upon his boy ; — and that ligament, fine as it was — was never broken ! Nature instantly ebb'd again; — the film returned to its place ; — the pulse fluttered ; — stopped ; — went on,— throbbed, — stopped again; —...
Seite 12 - A principal fruit of friendship is the ease and discharge of the fulness and swellings of the heart, which passions of all kinds do cause and induce. We know diseases of stoppings and suffocations are the most dangerous in the body; and it is not much otherwise in the mind...

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