The Baronage and the Senate: Or, The House of Lords in the Past, the Present, and the Future

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J. Murray, 1893 - 414 Seiten
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Seite 74 - But by your fathers' worth if yours you rate, Count me those only who were good and great. Go ! if your ancient but ignoble blood Has crept thro' scoundrels ever since the flood, Go!
Seite 110 - would be co-equal with the British name, and it would be remembered that he had obtained the greatest naval victory on record •' when no man would think of asking, Whether he had been created a baron, a viscount, or an earl...
Seite 86 - Boastful and rough, your first son is a 'squire ; The next a tradesman, meek, and much a liar ; Tom struts a soldier, open, bold, and brave ; "Will sneaks a scrivener, an exceeding knave.
Seite 67 - When Henry VII. called his first parliament, there were only twenty-nine temporal peers to be found, and even some of them took their seats illegally, for they had been attainted. Of those twenty-nine not five remain, and they, as the Howards for instance, are not Norman nobility. We owe the English peerage to three sources : the spoliation of the church ; the open and flagrant sale of its honours by the elder Stuarts ; and the boroughmongering of our own times.
Seite 118 - America, which is beyond all other countries the country of a "career open to talents," a country, moreover, in which political life is unusually keen and political ambition widely diffused, it might be expected that the highest place would always be won by a man of brilliant gifts. But...
Seite 155 - Where by divers sundry old authentic histories and chronicles it is manifestly declared and expressed that this realm of England is an empire, and so hath been accepted in the world, governed by one Supreme Head and King having the dignity and royal estate of the imperial Crown of the same...
Seite 67 - We owe the English peerage to three sources : the spoliation of the Church ; the open and flagrant sale of its honours by the elder Stuarts ; and the boroughmongering of our own times. Those are the three main sources of the existing peerage of England, and in my opinion disgraceful ones.
Seite 67 - Saxon families in this county who can trace their pedigrees beyond the Conquest ; I know of some Norman gentlemen whose fathers undoubtedly came over with the Conqueror. But a peer with an ancient lineage is to me quite a novelty. No, no ; the thirty years of the wars of the Roses freed us from those gentlemen. I take it, after the battle of Tewkesbury, a Norman baren was almost as rare a being in England as a wolf is now.
Seite 111 - I can do no more. We must trust to the great Disposer of all events, and the justice of our cause. I thank God for this great opportunity of doing my duty.
Seite 110 - Had it pleased God to continue to me the hopes of succession, I should have been, according to my mediocrity, and the mediocrity of the age I live in, a sort of founder of a family. I should have left a son, who, in all the points in which personal merit can be viewed, in science, in erudition, in genius, in taste, in...

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