Every Man His Own Gardener: Being a New and Much More Complete Gardener's Calendar and General Directory Than Any One Hitherto Published ...

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F. C. and J. Rivington, 1818 - 727 Seiten
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Seite 294 - Indian policy, and the sooner this is done the better it will be for all concerned.
Seite 151 - Strain your line along the bed six inches from the edge; then with a spade cut out a small trench or drill close to the line, about six inches deep, making that side next the line nearly upright...
Seite 125 - ... upright side of the stock, at the back of the slope, inserting it with great exactness, as far as it is cut, with the thickest edge outwards, and so that the rind may meet exactly every way with the rind of the stock.
Seite 420 - June;) and when these had afforded shoots about four inches long, the remaining ligatures were taken off to permit the excess of sap to pass on, and the young shoots were nailed to the wall. Being there properly exposed to the light, their young wood ripened well, and afforded blossoms in the succeeding spring...
Seite 361 - ... tenderness, should be kept dry after the foliage is decayed, until within about a month of their period of regerminating ; at which time they should, after having been deprived of their surplus offsets, be repotted in good fresh earth. There are some descriptions of bulbous and tuberous roots that need not be taken up oftener than once in two or three years, and then only to deprive them of the young offsets, and to manure the ground.
Seite 122 - GRAFTING. Grafting is the taking a shoot from one tree and inserting it into another in such a manner that both may unite closely and become one tree. These shoots are called scions or grafts, and in the choice of them...
Seite 451 - Select some best summer fruit from good, productive plants, which permit to continue in full growth till they become yellow. Then cut them from the vine, and place them upright on end, in the full sun, for two or three weeks ; when they may be cut open, and the seed...
Seite 73 - When it is intended to have a constant supply of asparagus in the winter and spring season, till that in the natural ground comes in, you should make a new hot-bed every three weeks or a month. A quantity of fresh plants must also be procured for every new bed ; for those which have been once forced in a hot-bed are not fit for any use afterwards, either in a hot-bed or the natural ground. When...
Seite 122 - ... and, though it be not above a quarter of an inch thick, it will keep out the air more effectually than the clay ; and, as cold will harden this, there is no danger of its being hurt by frost, which is very apt to cause the clay to cleave, and...
Seite 418 - ... into the wood, drawing it under the bud, and cut the -piece off across the shoot; then immediately let that part of the wood which was cut off with the bud be separated from it, which may be readily done with the knife, by placing the point of it between the bark and wood at one end, and, holding the bark in one hand, pull off the woody part with the other, which will readily come from the bark, if the tree from which it was taken be in a vigorous condition.

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