The British Flower Garden: Containing Coloured Figures & Descriptions of the Most Ornamental & Curious Hardy Herbaceous Plants ...

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Seite 77 - A dose of thirty grains has been found not only to excite vomiting, but to produce headache, vertigo, and temporary blindness. The germination of this plant is very curious, and has been thus described by Mr. NUTTALL. " The seed does not appear to possess any thing like a proper cotyledon ; the embryo, formed in the exact posture of the growing plant (with the radicle downwards), differs not from it in any particular but that of size. In place of a cotyledon there is a sheathing stipule, similar...
Seite 77 - ... its functions ; this callus, or seminal tubercle, is roundish, and turbinate, nearly as large as a filbert nut, very solid, and carneous, possessing in a high degree the alliaceous foetor of the grown plant ; the mutual point of attachment subsisting betwixt this body and the embryon, is at first a minute and nearly central funiculus, which...
Seite 77 - ... of the grown plant ; the mutual point of attachment subsisting between this body and the embryo is, at first, a minute and nearly central funiculus, which enlarges and becomes more distinct during the progress of germination ; but what appears to be most singular with respect to it is the length of time that it continues attached to the growing plant, lying apparently inert at the base of the caudex for twelve, or even eighteen months.
Seite 100 - Stamina approximate aut coarctata (nee coalita) ad apicem dentium tori pentagoni 5 dentati inserta. Filamenta basi dilatata oblonga vel triangularia, antheras demissius gerentia; lobi antherarum basi divergentes ; stamina 2 anteriora dorso appendices varias nectariferas in calcar intrantes gerentia. Ovarium nunc superum, nunc basi toro concavo cinctum et ideo semiinferum.
Seite 77 - ... proper cotyledon; the embryo, formed in the exact posture of the growing plant (with the radicle downwards), differs not from it in any particular but that of size. In place of a cotyledon there is a sheathing stipule, similar to that which is ever after produced ; in fact, it is viviparous. The embryo is seated in a small umbilical or hemispherical depression, in the upper end of what may be called a vitellus rather than a perisperm, judging by its functions : this callus, or seminal tubercle,...

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