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ENGLISH LITERATURE:

A SELECTION OF

THE CHOICEST PRODUCTIONS OF ENGLISH AUTHORS,

FROM THE EARLIEST TO THE PRESENT TIME,

CONNECTED BY A

CRITICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORY.

ELEGANTLY ILLUSTRATED.

EDITED BY

ROBERT CHAMBERS,
EDITOR OF THE " EDINBURGH JOURNAL," “ INFORMATION FOR THE PEOPLE," ITO. ETO.

IN TWO VOLUMES. VOL. I.

TENTH THOUSAND.

BOSTON:

PUBLISHED BY GOULD, KENDALL AND LINCOLN,

No. 59 WASHINOTON STREET.

1849.

THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY 230085

ASTOR, LENOX AND
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS.

1904

PREFACE.

This work originated in a desire, on the part of the Publishers, to supply what they considered a deflciency in the Literature addressed at the present time to the great body of the People. In the late efforts for the improvement of the popular mind, the removal of mere ignorance has been the chief object held in view: attention has been mainly given to what might be expected to impart technical knowledge; and in the cultivation of what is certainly but a branch of the intellectual powers, it has been thought that the great end was gained. It is not necessary here to present arguments establishing that there are faculties for cognising the beautiful in art, thought, and feeling, as well as for perceiving and enjoying the truths of physical science and of fact. Nor is it needful to show how elegant and reflective literature, especially,, tends to moralise, to soften, and to adorn the soul and life of man. Assuming this as granted, we were anxious to take the aid of the press-or rather of the Printing Machine, for by it alone could the object be accomplished-to bring the belles lettres into the list of those agencies which are now operating for the mental advancement of the middle and humbler portions of society.

It appeared that, for a first effort, nothing could be more suitable than a systematised series of extracts from our national authors ; "a concentration"—to quote the language of the prospectus—" of the best productions of English intellect, from Anglo-Saxon to the present times, in the various departments headed by Chaucer, Shakspeare, Milton—by More, Bacon, Locke-by Hooker, Taylor, Barrowby Addison, Johnson, Goldsmith-by Hume, Robertson, Gibbon-set in a biographical and critical history of the literature itself." By this a double end might, it seemed, be served; as the idea of the work in. cluded the embodiment of a distinct and valuable portion of knowledge, as well as that mass of polite literature which was looked to for the effect above described. In the knowledge of what has been done by English literary genius in all ages, it cannot be doubted that we have a branch of the national history, not only in itself important, as well as interesting, but which reflects a light upon other departments of history—for is not the Elizabethan Drama, for example, an exponent, to some extent, of the state of the national mind at the time, and is it not equally one of the influences which may be presumed to have modified that mind in the age which followed ? Nor is it to be overlooked, how important an end is to be attained by training the entire people to venerate the thoughtful and eloquent of past and present times. These gifted beings may be said to have endeared our language and institutions our national character, and the very scenery and artificial objects which mark our soil—to all who are acquainted with, and can appreciate their writings. A regard for our national authors enters into and forms part of the most sacred feelings of every educated man, and it would not be easy to estimate in what degree it is to this sentiment that we are indebted for all of good and great that centres in the name of Eng. land. Assuredly, in our common reverence for a Shakspeare, a Milton, a Scott, we have a social and uniting sentiment, which not only contains in itself part of our happiness as a people, but much that counteracts influences that tend to set us in division.

A more special utility is contemplated for this work, in its serving to introduce the young to the Pantheon of English authors. The “ Elegant Extracts” of Dr Knox, after long enjoying popularity as a selection of polite literature for youths between school and college, has of late years sunk out of notice, in consequence of a change in public taste. It was almost exclusively devoted to the rhetorical literature, elegant but artificial, which flourished during the earlier half of the eighteenth century, overlooking even the great names of Chaucer and Spenser, as well as nearly the whole range of rich, though not faultless productions extending between the times of Shakspeare and Dryden. The time seemed to have come for a substitute work, in which at once the revived taste for our early literature should be gratified, and due attention be given to the authors who have lived since the time of Knox. Such a work it has been the humble aim of the editor to produce in that which is now laid before the public.

He takes this opportunity of acknowledging that very important assistance has been rendered throughout the Cyclopædia of English Literature, and particularly in the poetical department, by Mr Robert Carruthers of loverness.

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WILLIAM CAXTON,

54 CHRISTOPHER MARLOWJOBRUA SYLVESTER-RICHARD

Legend of St Francis,

55

BARNFIELD,

84

The Deposition of King Vortigern,

55 The Passionate Shepherd to his Love,

84

Jack Cade's Insurrection,

86 The Nymph's Reply to the Passionate Shepherd-Raleigh, 84

Scene in the Council-Room of the Protector Gloucester, 58 The Soul's Errand,

85

BIR THOMAS MORE,

58 Address to the Nightingale,

85

Letter to Lady More,

60 EDMUND SPENSER,

85

Character of Richard III.,

60 Una and the Redcross Knight,

89

The Utopian Idea of Pleasure,

60 Adventure of Una with the Lion,

89

John FISCHER,

62 The Bower of Bliss,

90

Character and Habits of the Countess of Richmond, 62 The Squire and the Dove,

91

Bir Thomas ELYOT,

64 Wedding of the Medway and the ham3s,

92

Different kinds of Exercise,

64 The House of Sleep,

93

HUGH LATIMER,

64 Description of Belphabe,

93

A Yeoman of Henry VII's time,

65 Fable of the Oak and the Briar,

94

Hasty Judgment,

65 From the Epithalamion,

95

Cause and Effect,

65 ROBERT SOUTHWELL,

96

The Shepherds of Bethlehem,

66 The Image of Death,

96

John Fox,

Times go by Turns,

96

The Invention of Printing,

67 Love's Servile Lot,

96

The Death of Queen Anne Boleyn,

68 Scorn not the Least,

97

A notable History of William Hunter, a young man of SAMUEL DANIEL,

97

19 years of age, pursued to death by Justice Brown for From the Epistle to the Countess of Cumberland,

97

the Gospel's sake, worthy of all young men and parents Richard II, the Morning before his Murder in Pomfret

to be read,

Castle,

96

JOHN LELAND,

69 Early Love,

98

GEORGE CAVENDISH,

70 Selections from Daniel's Sonnets,

98

King Ilenry's Visits to Wolsey's House,

70 MICHAEL DRAYTON,

98

LORD BERNERS,

71 Morning in Warwickshire-Description of a Stag-Hunt, 99

Battle of Cressy,

71 Part of the Twenty-Eighth Song of the Polyolbion, 100

JOHN BELLENDEN,

71 David and Goliah,

102

Part of the Story of Macbeth,

71 EDWARD FAIRFAX,

103

The New Maneris and the Auld, of Scottis,

72 Description of Armida and her Enchanted Girdle, 103

Extract from the Complaynt of Scotland,

72 Rinaldo at Mount Olivet and the Enchanted Wood, 103

Bishop BALE,

73 Sir John HARRINGTON,

10;

Death of Lord Cobham,

73 Of Treason,

104

WILLIAM TYNDALE,

73 Of Fortune,

104

Miles COVERDALE,

74 Against Writers that carp at other Men's Books,

104

Passage from Tyndale's Version of the Bible,

74 of a Precise Tailor,

104

Passage from Coverdale's Version,

74 Sir HENRY WOTTON,

104

Sir JOHN CHEKE,

74 To his Mistress, the Queen of Bohemia,

Remonstrance with Levellers,

75 A Farewell to the Vanities of the World,

105

THOMAS Wilson,

75 The Character of a Happy Life,

105

Simplicity of Style Recommended,

75 SHAKSPEARE,

105

Moral Aim of Poetry,

75 The lorse of Adonis,

106

ROGER ASCHAM,

76 Venus's Prophecy after the Death of Adonis,

106

Study should be relieved by Amusement,

76 Selections from Shakspeare's Sonnets,

106

The Blowing of the Wind,

77 Selections from Shakspeare's Songs,

107

Occupations should be chosen suitable to the Natural Sir JOHN DAVIES,

108

Faculties,

77 The Dancing of the Air,

108

Detached Observations from the Schoolmaster,
78 Reasons for the Soul's Immortality,

109

Qualifications of a Historian,

79 The Dignity of Man,

103

Joun Donne,

103

Address to Bishop Valentine, on the Day of the Marriage

Chird Períod.

of the Elector Palatine to the Princess Elizabeth, 110

Valediction-Forbidding Mourning,

110

The Will,

111

THE REIGNS OP ELIZABETH, JAMES I., AND

A Character from Donne's Satires,

111

CHARLES I.

(1558 TO 1649.]

Joseph HALL,

119

Selections from Ilall's Satires,

112

POETS.

BEN JONSON,

112

THOMAS SACKVILLE,

80

To Celia,

113

Allegorical Characters from the Mirtour for Magistrates, 80 The Sweet Neglect,

113

Henry Duke of Buckingham in the Infernal Regions, 82

Hymn to Diana,

113

JOHN HARRINGTON,

82 To Night,

113

Sonnet made on Isabella Markham,

82 Song--Oh do not wanton with those eyes),

113

BIR Philip SIDNEY,

82 To Celia,

113

Sonnets of Sir Philip Sidney,

82 Her Triumph,

113

BIR WALTER RALEIGH-TIMOTHY KENDALNICHOLAS Good Life, Long Life,

114

BRETON-ITENRY CONSTABLE,

83 Epitaph on the Countess of Pembroke,

114

The Country's Recreations-Raleigh,

83 Epitaph on Elizabeth, L. H.,

114

Farewell to Town-Breton,

83 On my First Daughter,

114

Bonnet-Constable,

84

To Penshurst,

114

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To the Memory of my Beloved Master, William Shak- The Votaress of Diana,

speare, and what he hath left us,

115

WILLIAM CARTWRIGHT,

On the Portrait of Shakspeare,

115 To a Lady Veiled,

RICHARD CORBET,

116 A Valediction,

To Vincent Corbet, his Son,

116

To Chloe,

Journey to France,

116 The Dream,

Farewell to the Fairies,

117 Love inconcealable,

Bis John BEAUMONT-DR HENRY Kino,

117

To Cupid,

On my dear Son, Gervase Beaumont,

118

ROBERT HERRICK,

Song-Dry those fair, those crystal eyes),

118 To Blossoms,

Sic Vita,

118 To Daffodils,

The Dirge,

118 The Kiss-a Dialogue,

FRANCIS BEAUMONT,

118

To the Virgins, to make much of their Time,

Letter to Ben Jonson,

119 Twelfth Night, or King and Queen,

On the Tombs in Westminster,

119

The Country Life,

An Epitaph, .

119 Julia,

Toomas CAREW,

120 Upon Julia's Recovery,

Bong- Ask me no more where Jove bestows),

120

The Bag of the Bee,

The Compliment,

120

Upon a Child that Died,

Song—Would you know what's soft'?

120

Epitaph upon a Child,

A Pastoral Dialogue,

121

A Thanksgiving for his House,

Song-Give me more love, or more disdain),

121

To Primroses, filled with Morning Dew,

Persuasions to Love,

121

Delight in Disorder,

Disdain Returned,

121

To find God,

Approach of Spring,

121

Cherry Ripe,

PAINEAS AND GIles FLETCHER,

122

To Corinna, to go a Maying,

Happiness of the Shepherd's Life,

122

RICHARD LOVELACE,

Decay of Human Greatness,

123

Song-(Why should you swear I am forsworn ?)

Description of Parthenia, or Chastity,

123

The Rose,

The Rainbow,

123

Song-(Amarantha, sweet and fair),

The Sorceress of Vain Delight,

124

To Lucasta, on going to the Wars,

GEORGE WITHER,

125

To Althea, from Prison,

The Companionship of the Muse,

125 THOMAS RANDOLPB,

Sonnet upon a Stolen Kiss,

126

To my Picture,

The Steadfast Shepherd,

126

To a Lady admiring herself in a Looking-Glass,

Madrigal— Amaryllis I did woo),

Sir William DAVENANT,

Christmas,

127 To the Queen,

WILLIAM BROWNE,

128

Song-The lark now leaves his watery nest),

A Descriptive Sketch,

128

Description of the Virgin Birtha,

Evening,

128 John CLEVELAND,

Night,

129

On Phillis, Walking before Sunrise,

Pastoral Employments,

129

JAMES SHIRLEY,

The Syren's Song,

129

Death's Final Conquest,

FRANCIS QUARLES,

129

Upon his Mistress Sad,

Stanzas,

129

Echo and Narcissus,

The Shortness of Life,

129

RICHARD CRASHAW,

Mors Tua,

130

Music's Duel,

The Vanity of the World,

130

Temperance, or the Cheap Physician,

Delight in God only,

130

Ilymn to the Name of Jesus,

Decay of Life,

130

Sir RICHARD PANSHAWE,

To Chastity,

131

A Rose,

GEORGE HERBERT,

131

A Rich Fool,

Virtue,

132

Song-The Saint's Encouragement,

Religion,

132

Song-The Royalist,

Stanzas,

132 | LADY ELIZABETH CAREW,

Matin llymon,

132

Revenge of Injuries,

Sunday,

132

Mortification,

133

SCOTTISH POETS.

WILLIAM ILABINOTON,

133 ALEXANDER Scot,

Epistle to a friend,

133 Rondel of Love,

Description of Castara,

134 To his Heart,

Bir Joux SUCKLING,

134 Sir RICHARD MAITLAND,

Song— "Tis now, since I sat down before),

135 Satire on the Town Ladies,

A Ballad upon a Wedding,

135 ALEXANDER MONTOOMERY,

Constancy,

136 ALEXANDER HUME,

Song-1 prithee send me back my heart),

136 Kino JAMES VI.,

Song—Why so pale and wan, fond lover ?)

136 Ane Schort Poeme of Tymne,

The Careless Lover,

136 EARL OF ANCRUM-EARL OF STIRLINO,

Song-last thou seen the down in the air ?)

136 Sonnet in Praise of a Solitary Life,

Detraction Execrated,

136 WILLIAM DRUMMOND,

Jonx CHALKHILL,

137 The River of Forth Feasting,

The Witch's Cave,

137 Epitaph on Prince Henry,

The Priestess of Diana,

138 To his Lute,

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