The Remains of Henry Kirke White, of Nottingham, Late of St. John's College, Cambridge, Band 2

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1807
 

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Seite 128 - Go, lovely rose ! Tell her that wastes her time and me, That now she knows, When I resemble her to thee, How sweet and fair she seems to be. Tell her that's young, And shuns to have her graces spied, That hadst thou sprung In deserts, where no men abide, Thou must have uncommended died. Small is the worth Of beauty from the light retired ; Bid her come forth, Suffer herself to be desired, And not blush so to be admired. Then die, that she The common fate of all things rare May read in thee ; How...
Seite 124 - When, marshalled on the nightly plain, The glittering host bestud the sky, One Star alone, of all the train, Can fix the sinner's wandering eye. Hark ! hark ! to God the chorus breaks, From every host, from every gem ; But one alone the Saviour speaks, It is the star of Bethlehem.
Seite 195 - He bowed the heavens also, and came down : and darkness was under his feet. And he rode upon a cherub, and did fly : yea, he did fly upon the wings of the wind.
Seite 209 - Tis she ! — but why that bleeding bosom gor'd ' Why dimly gleams the visionary sword ? Oh ever beauteous, ever friendly ! tell, Is it in heaven a crime to love too well ? To bear too tender or too firm a heart, To act a Lover's or a Roman's part ? Is there no bright reversion in the sky For those...
Seite 198 - Who layeth the beams of his chambers in the waters, and maketh the clouds his chariot, and walketh upon the wings of the wind.
Seite 196 - THE Lord descended from above, And bowed the heavens most high ; And underneath his feet he cast The darkness of the sky. 2 On cherub and on cherubim, Full royally he rode ; And on the wings of mighty winds Came flying all abroad.
Seite 125 - It was my guide, my light, my all ; It bade my dark forebodings cease ; And, through the storm and danger's thrall, It led me to the port of peace. Now, safely moor'd, my perils o'er, I'll sing, first in night's diadem, For ever, and for evermore, The star, the star of Bethlehem ! THE HIDING-PLACE.
Seite 206 - Through Pope's soft song though all the Graces breathe, And happiest art adorn his Attic page; Yet does my mind with sweeter transport glow, As at the root of mossy trunk reclin'd, In magic Spenser's wildly-warbled song I see deserted Una wander wide Through wasteful solitudes, and lurid heaths...
Seite 203 - ... and without ornament. The most elegant critic of antiquity, Longinus, in his Treatise on the Sublime, adduces the following passage from the Book of Genesis, as possessing that quality in an eminent degree : " God said let there be light, and there was light : — Let the earth be, and earth Was.
Seite 59 - Thou broodest on the calm that cheers the lands, And thou dost bear within thine awful hands The rolling thunders and the lightnings fleet, Stern on thy dark-wrought car of cloud and wind, Thou guid'st the northern storm at night's dead noon, Or on the red wing of the fierce Monsoon, Disturb'st the sleeping giant of the Ind. In the drear silence of the polar span Dost thou repose ? or in the solitude Of sultry tracts, where the lone caravan Hears nightly howl the tiger's hungry brood ? Vain thought...

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