Ambarvalia: Poems

Cover
Chapman and Hall, 1849 - 155 Seiten
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 51 - But O blithe breeze ! and O great seas, Though ne'er, that earliest parting past, On your wide plain they join again, Together lead them home at last. One port, methought, alike they sought, One purpose hold where'er they fare, — O bounding breeze, O rushing seas ! At last, at last, unite them there ! Qui LABORAT, ORAT.
Seite 23 - Lo, here is God, and there is God ! Believe it not, O Man ; In such vain sort to this and that The ancient heathen ran : Though old Religion shake her head, And say in bitter grief, The day behold, at first foretold, Of atheist unbelief: Take better part, with manly heart, Thine adult spirit can ; Receive it not, believe it not, Believe it not, O Man ! As men at dead of night awaked With cries,
Seite 3 - We know not, sang they, what avails to know ? Whereat the questioning spirit, some short space, Though unabashed, stood quiet in his place. But as the echoing chorus died away And to their dreams the rest returned apace, By the one spirit I saw him kneeling low, And in a silvery whisper heard him say : Truly, thou know'st not, and thou need'st not know ; Hope only, hope thou, and believe alway ; I also know not, and I need not know, Only with questionings pass I to and fro, Perplexing these that...
Seite 50 - E'en so — but why the tale reveal Of those whom, year by year unchanged, Brief absence joined anew to feel, Astounded, soul from soul estranged. At dead of night their sails were filled, And onward each rejoicing steered — Ah, neither blame, for neither willed, Or wist, what first with dawn appeared...
Seite 41 - HERE am I yet, another twelvemonth spent. One-third departed of the mortal span, Carrying on the child into the man, Nothing into reality. Sails rent, And rudder broken, — reason impotent, — • Affections all unfixed ; so forth I fare On the mid seas unheedingly, so dare To do and to be done by, well content. So was it from the first, so is it yet ; Yea, the first kiss that by these lips was set On any human lips, methinks was sin — Sin, cowardice, and falsehood ; for the will Into a deed...
Seite 2 - I know not, I will do my duty, said the last. Thy duty do ? rejoined the voice, Ah, do it, do it, and rejoice ; But shalt thou then, when all is done, Enjoy a love, embrace a beauty Like these, that may be seen and won In life, whose course will then be run ; Or wilt thou be where there is none ? I know not, I will do my duty. And taking up the word around, above, below, Some querulously high, some softly, sadly low, We know not...
Seite 40 - And whether indeed they be or be not, Try not, test not, feel not, see not : 'Tis walk and dance, sit down and rise By leading, opening ne'er your eyes ; Stunt sturdy limbs that Nature gave, And be drawn in a Bath chair along to the grave. 'Tis the stern and prompt suppressing, As an obvious deadly sin, All the questing and the guessing Of the soul's own soul within...
Seite 23 - Rush forth and greet whome'er they meet, Whoe'er shall first appear; And still repeat, to all the street, ' 'Tis he, — the king is here...
Seite 18 - O not unowned, thou shalt unnamed forgive, In worldly walks the prayerless heart prepare; And if in work its life it seem to live, Shalt make that work be prayer.
Seite 32 - Are there not, then, two musics unto men ?— One loud and bold and coarse, And overpowering still perforce All tone and tune beside ; Yet in despite its pride Only of fumes of foolish fancy bred, And sounding solely in the sounding head : The other, soft and low, Stealing whence we not know...

Bibliografische Informationen