Understanding To Kill a Mockingbird: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historic Documents

Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, 1994 - 225 Seiten

To Kill a Mockingbird is a novel of such profound power that it has affected the lives of readers and left and indelible mark on American culture. This rich collection of historical documents, collateral readings, and commentary captures the essence of the novel's impact, making it an ideal resource for students, teachers, and library media specialists. Drawing on multi-disciplinary sources, the casebook places the issues of race, censorship, stereotyping, and heroism into sharp perspective. Through these documents, the reader also gains a taste for the historical events which influenced the novel as well as the novel's relevance in today's world. Among the documents which speak most eloquently are testimony from the Scottsboro Case of the 1930s, memoirs and interviews with African Americans and whites who grew up in Alabama in the 1930s, and news stories on civil rights activities in Alabama in the 1950s. Most of the documents presented are available in no other printed form. Study questions, project ideas, and bibliographies are also included for ease of use in further examination of the issues raised by the novel. Thirteen historical photographs complement the text.

Following a literary analysis of issues raised by the novel, the casebook opens with testimony and newspaper articles from the 1930s Alabama Scottsboro Case. The significant parallels of this case to the novel paint a social and historical background of the novel. Memoirs and interviews with African Americans and whites who grew up in Alabama in the 1930s further complete the historical landscape. Articles and news stories from the 1950s depict the increasingly tense, volatile environment in which the novel was written and published. Documents examine the stereotypes of the poor white, the African American, and the southern belle; and how the novel allows the reader to walk around in the shoes of those who have been stereotyped. More current articles examine the legal, literary, and ethical ramifications of the novel. These articles include a debate between lawyers over whether Atticus Finch was a hero, and discussion of attempts to censor the novel.

 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Inhalt

II
1
III
15
IV
22
V
32
VI
33
VII
37
VIII
45
IX
53
XXXII
140
XXXIII
142
XXXIV
145
XXXV
154
XXXVI
157
XXXVII
165
XXXVIII
166
XL
167

X
62
XI
69
XII
83
XIII
93
XIV
99
XV
101
XVI
102
XVII
103
XVIII
104
XIX
106
XX
107
XXI
112
XXII
116
XXIII
117
XXIV
118
XXV
120
XXVI
122
XXVII
124
XXVIII
125
XXIX
127
XXX
129
XXXI
137
XLI
168
XLII
170
XLIII
175
XLIV
177
XLVI
180
XLVII
181
XLVIII
187
XLIX
189
L
191
LI
197
LII
202
LIII
203
LIV
205
LVI
206
LVII
207
LVIII
208
LIX
211
LX
212
LXI
213
LXII
214
LXIII
221
Urheberrecht

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Über den Autor (1994)

CLAUDIA DURST JOHNSON is Professor of English at the University of Alabama, where she chaired the English Department for 12 years. She is the author of the forthcoming volumes in the Greenwood Press Literature in Context series, Understanding the Scarlet Letter and Understanding Huckleberry Finn. She is also author of To Kill a Mockingbird: Threatening Boundaries (1994), American Actress. Perspective on the Nineteenth Century (1984), (with Vernon E. Johnson) Memoirs of the Nineteenth-Century Theatre (Greenwood, 1982), The Productive Tension of Hawthorne's Art (1981), and (with Henry Jacobs) An Annotated Bibliography of Shakespearean Burlesques, Parodies, and Travesties (1976), as well as numerous articles on American literature.

Bibliografische Informationen