The Geography of the Heavens: And Class-book of Astronomy : Accompanied by a Celestial Atlas

Couverture
Mason Brothers, 1860 - 345 pages
 

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Aucun commentaire n'a été trouvé aux emplacements habituels.

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 114 - Look, how the floor of heaven Is thick inlaid with patines* of bright gold: There's not the smallest orb, which thou behold'st, But in his motion like an angel sings, Still quiring to the young-eyed cherubim: Such harmony is in immortal souls; . But, whilst this muddy vesture of decay Doth grossly close it in, we cannot hear it.
Page 157 - ... and the stars of heaven fell unto the earth, even as a fig tree casteth her untimely figs, when she is shaken of a mighty wind.
Page 152 - And God made two great lights; the greater light to rule the day, and the lesser light to rule the night: he made the stars also. And God set them in the firmament of the heaven to give light upon the earth, and to rule over the day, and over the night, and to divide the light from the darkness: and God saw that it was good. And the evening and the morning were the fourth day.
Page 147 - Canst thou bind the sweet influences of Pleiades, or loose the bands of Orion? Canst thou bring forth Mazzaroth in his season? or canst thou guide Arcturus with his sons?
Page 143 - To God's eternal house direct the way, A broad and ample road, whose dust is gold, And pavement stars, as stars to thee appear Seen in the galaxy, that milky way Which nightly as a circling zone thou seest Powder'd with stars.
Page 49 - The breathless Phaeton, with flaming hair, Shot from the chariot, like a falling star, That in a summer's evening from the top Of heaven drops down, or seems at least to drop ; Till on the Po his blasted corpse was hurl'd, Far from his country, in the western world.
Page 47 - Also he sent forth a dove from him, to see if the waters were abated from off the face of the ground; but the dove found no rest for the sole of her foot, and she returned unto him into the ark...
Page 155 - And oft, before tempestuous winds arise, The seeming stars fall headlong from the skies, And, shooting through the darkness, gild the night With sweeping glories, and long trails of light...
Page 94 - Lo, these are parts of his ways: but how little a portion is heard of him? but the thunder of his power who can understand?
Page 79 - The raven once in snowy plumes was drest, White as the whitest dove's unsully'd breast, Fair as the guardian of the Capitol, Soft as the swan ; a large and lovely fowl ; His tongue, his prating tongue had chang'd him quite To sooty blackness from the purest white.

Informations bibliographiques